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Bolivarian Republic of Venezuela

Speckled Tanager Tangara guttata chrysophrys ©Trevor Hardaker Website

Birding Venezuela

Venezuela serves as an excellent introduction to South America. It has a decent bird book (and a new one under production); a quite good road system, many accessible national parks and quite good infrastructure. It used to be vary safe, but today is no better or worse than other destinations in South America. Care is needed not be out of sight of your car, nor to bird alone near big cities (i.e Maracay). Hiring a car with a driver is a good idea (not only in Venezuela).

If you have never birded South America before I would start a three week trip in Los Llanos - the Orinoco basin which has overwhelming numbers of large birds such as storks, ibises and herons as well as many raptors. This is probably one of the most seductive types of birding one can do to get non-birding spouses into birding. There are many luxurious lodges that provide good services for birders. People on tight budgets may want to check out the areas near Mantecal, but if you can afford it the lodges are very good.

Your first trip to S.A should also include the Andes of Merida. Birding is quite easy there. There are many good birding sites from Barinas to Merida via Santo Domingo, and an excellent mountain trail through cloud forest from Tabai just outside Merida. The trail is quite strenuous to do all in one day, so one may want to spend a couple of days here and even camp in the top area where some of the best Merida birds occur such as Rusty-faced Parrot and Slaty-backed Hemispingus. Other areas to include in west Venezuela is the endemic-rich Coro dessert and the coastal range of Henri Pittier National Park - also with many endemics. Henri Pittier NP has two bisecting roads that are both very good for birding. One of them takes you to the biological station of Rancho Grande. The birding from the veranda in mid-morning is exceptional and here you can get somewhat familiarised with the overwhelming diversity of neotropical birds and get to know many examples that represent typical South American families.

Now after three weeks you are set for some advanced neo-tropical birding and you should turn your attention to the South East; here there are two principal areas. The first, Campamento Rio Grande, has become renowned for its stake-out of Harpy Eagle nests. There are some three-four nests in the area and there has been at least one active every year since this became widely known at the beginning of the nineties. Birding in general is very good, but it can be quite frustrating sometimes, with birds in mixed species flocks that you don´t get good looks at, as well as many unfamiliar calls. If you really want to see all the birds here it is a very good idea to employ a guide.

Similarly the base of the Guyanan shield, at the bottom of the Escalera road, has rain-forest and some good trails which are also very species rich but difficult to work if you have little experience with calls in the Amazon. The escalera itself is quite straightforward and the number of accessible endemic birds is very high.

Finally, some mention of the areas in the North East which could be included after say 12 days in the South east. The oilbird cave at Caripe is impressive and one of the most accessible sites in South America for this species. The Paria peninsula and especially the Cerro Humo trail holds a handful of endemics all threatened by habitat-loss.

NB November 2016 - Venezuela is going through economic meltdown with a vast and rising crime rate and unprecedented migration as people flee poverty. In many places plantations have ceased production. The country's international debt is crippling.

Birders should check news services for latest changes. UK Government Foreign Office alerts give sound advice to potential travellers and similar services are available from most western governments.

Top Sites

Coastal Cordillera - Henri Pittier National Park

Satellite View

Created in 1937 in honour of a Swiss botanist, Henri Pittier National Park has acquired legendary status amongst Neotropical birders and today figures as an obligatory stop on any visitor`s itinerary. Although the park comprises just over 1000 square kilometres – half the size of the United Kingdom`s Snowdonia National Park – the list of species recorded tops 550 and includes several Venezuelan first records. Besides quantity, the park also provides quality in the form of a large number of rare and endemic species. The chief attraction is its lush cloud forest which harbours avian delights such as Venezuelan Wood-Quail, Band-tailed Guan, Helmeted Curassow, Groove-billed Toucanet, Guttulated Foliage-gleaner, White-streaked Antvireo, Scallop-breasted Antpitta, Scalloped Antthrush, Caracas Tapaculo, Venezuelan Bristle-Tyrant, Handsome Fruiteater and Rufous-cheeked Tanager. Raptors are particularly conspicuous and Black Hawk-Eagle, Ornate Hawk-Eagle, Black-and-white Hawk-Eagle and Solitary Eagle are all considerably easier to encounter here than elsewhere within their wide range. The deciduous forests of the lower slopes are home to Black-backed Antshrike, Venezuelan Flycatcher and Golden-winged Sparrow while the coast holds Buffy Hummingbird, Bicoloured Conebill and Glaucous Tanager. In addition to its resident avifauna, the park is famous for the Portachuelo Pass, which is one of the most studied migratory routes in the Neotropics. Excellent accommodation at several strategic sites on the park borders makes this area a real pleasure to bird.

Llanos - Hato Piñero

Satellite View

The Venezuelan llanos, or 'flatlands', provide a wildlife spectacle on a par with anything else America has to offer and, indeed, have sometimes been referred to as America's East Africa. The llanos flood during the wet season and some regions become a vast lake. With the onset of the dry season, the waters drop and isolated creeks and pools begin to dry up, creating a feeding bonanza for caiman, anacondas, mammals and birds alike. Hato Piñero is a private cattle ranch nestling in the northern llanos and offering birding packages in comfortable accommodation. The draft list of birds found at the 800 square kilometre ranch currently stands at 300 and when you take your first ride in one of the open-top trucks, it's easy to believe that the total will eventually be much higher. Seven species of ibis can be found on a single excursion, herons and egrets abound, Yellow-knobbed Curassows are a traffic hazard and Sunbitterns are easier to view here than almost anywhere else. Besides its extensive wetlands, Hato Piñero also boasts one of the largest areas of intact deciduous forest in the entire llanos, a habitat which is home to White-fringed Antwren, White-throated Spadebill, Fuscous Flycatcher, Pale-tipped Inezia, Pale-eyed Pygmy-Tyrant and Trinidad Euphonia. Gallery forests hold Pale-headed Jacamar, Rusty-backed Spinetail and Orinocan Saltator while forest patches are good for Dwarf Cuckoo, Scarlet Macaw, Russet-throated Puffbird and White-bearded Flycatcher. Night excursions are a major attraction and typically produce Common and Great Potoos, Lesser Nighthawk, Pauraque and White-tailed Nightjar, though Nacunda Nighthawk and Striped Owl, Spectacled Owl and large cats are regular: Hato Piñero is one of the best places anywhere within its wide range to encounter a Jaguar.

Andes - La Mucuy and the Humboldt Trail

Satellite View

The Humboldt Trail is another of those must bird sites. This Andean trail is a wide, old Spanish pack-horse track which winds up from the ranger station at La Mucuy to the Pico Humboldt. Fortunately, the only users are hikers and birders with the occasional curious day-visitor, so that it is not uncommon to enjoy these marvellous cloud forests and their avian denizens in complete solitude. The trail begins at 2100m and can comfortably be birded to about 2700m in a morning – above that one can camp in order to access the high-altitude bamboo breaks and páramo. Often, the first species one encounters is Rufous-banded Owl in the La Mucuy car park itself. The recreation area provides excellent birding with Mérida Sunangel, Gorgeted Woodstar and Moustached Brush-Finch being typical. During the northern winter migrant warblers fill out the colourful subtropical mixed feeding flocks. Further up the trail Rose-headed Parakeet, Golden-headed Quetzal, Golden Starfrontlet, Mérida Tapaculo, Golden-breasted Fruiteater and White-fronted Whitestart are usually easy. Rusty-faced Parrots are a question of luck whilst the four species of Antpitta, including the endemic Grey-naped, require patience. Of the four Hemispingus, Grey-capped is common, whereas Slaty-backed is unreliable at the higher elevations. Excellent accommodation is available just a short drive from the trailhead.

Tepuis - La Escalera

Satellite View

Yet another, legendary birding name, La Escalera literally means the staircase and refers to a road which winds up from the Guayanan lowland forests onto the grassy plateau known as the Gran Sabana. The escarpment up which the road climbs is covered in a dense cloud forest which is home to most of the Pantepui endemics which are more typical of the foothill slopes of the table mountains (tepuis) proper; thus it gives easy access to real Pantepui birding. There are some at least 38 Pantepui endemics (more study is certain to reveal further endemics); many of which are only found in Venezuela and most of which are far more easily seen here than anywhere else. Easily found along the forested roadside are Fiery-shouldered Parakeet, Rufous-breasted Sabrewing, Peacock Coquette, Velvet-browed Brilliant, Scarlet-horned Manakin, Scarlet-horned Manakin, Orange-bellied Manakin, Tepui Brush-Finch, Tepui Whitestart and Tepui Mountain-Grackle. An eye overhead will usually be rewarded with Tepui Swifts and the rather less reliable Tepui Parrotlet. More challenging still are skulkers like Tepui Tinamou, Tepui Antpitta and Flutist Wren. The beginning of the Gran Sabana is the place to look for Tepui Goldenthroat as well as Russet-crowned Crake and Tawny-headed Swallow and rarities like Giant Snipe and Bearded Tachuri. In the dry season the forested slopes and sandstone cliffs echo to the ethereal songs of White and Bearded Bellbirds. In addition, more world-class birding is to be had in the lowlands at the foot of La Escalera. Excellent accommodation is available five minutes from the base of La Escalera.

Amazonas - Gavilán Road

Satellite View

Due in part to lack of access, Venezuelan Amazonas is relatively little birded in comparison with the neighbouring countries of Colombia, Ecuador, Peru and Brazil. The best-known lodge, Junglaven, is rather remote and costly to access, so it comes as a welcome surprise to find excellent Amazonian birding just a few kilometres south of the sleepy town of Puerto Ayacucho. I first accompanied Mary Lou Goodwin along this road several years ago and am certain that continued exploration will produce a very respectable bird list. Although the road has been heavily deforested and initially looks rather fruitless, perseverance pays off. The road gives access to a variety of Amazonian habitats including savannah, white sand scrub, moriche palm swamps and tall humid forests and it is a good idea to bird all habitats to ensure a good representative overview. Typical Amazonian groups are the bread-and-butter of this road: about 15 species of parrot, six toucans, four Celeus woodpeckers, plenty of woodcreepers, Furnariids and antbirds and a host of flycatchers and tanagers. The remaining chunks of primary forest are good places to listen for Rufous-winged Ground-Cuckoo; White-plumed and Rufous-throated Antbirds will be found at the same antswarms. Treetops should be scanned for Paradise Jacamar, Spangled and Pompadour Cotingas and White-browed Purpletuft. Moriche swamps hold the specialist Point-tailed Palmcreeper and Sulphury Flycatcher. Forested creeks have Long-billed Woodcreeper, Black-chinned Antbird and, with luck, Amazonian Black-Tyrant. Guianan Cock-of-the-Rocks are not uncommon and add a touch of colour. Good accommodation exists on the outskirts of Puerto Ayacucho and many more Amazonian species can be picked up at a variety of sites nearby.

Contributor

Chris Sharpe

Bird Venezuela

Contributor of Top Sites

sharpebirder AT gmail.com

Number of Species

Number of bird species: 1405

As at November 2016

Endemics

Number of endemics: 42 [13 Non-passerines & 29 Passerines]

Non-passerines
Tepui Tinamou Crypturellus ptaritepui Venezuelan Wood-Quail Odontophorus columbianus Groove-billed Toucanet Aulacorhynchus sulcatus Red-eared Parakeet Pyrrhura hoematotis Rose-headed Parakeet Pyrrhura rhodocephala Green-tailed Emerald Chlorostilbon alice Tachira Emerald Amazilia distans Scissor-tailed Hummingbird Hylonympha macrocerca Violet-chested Hummingbird Sternoclyta cyanopectus Merida Sunangel Heliangelus spencei Roraiman Nightjar Caprimulgus whitelyi Rusty-flanked Crake Laterallus levraudi Plain-flanked Rail Rallus wetmorei

Number of endemics: 42

Passerines Maracaibo Tody-Flycatcher Todirostrum viridanum Great Elaenia Elaenia dayi Venezuelan Bristle-Tyrant Phylloscartes venezuelanus Black-fronted Tyrannulet Phylloscartes nigrifrons Chapman`s Tyrannulet Phylloscartes chapmani White-bearded Flycatcher Phelpsia inornata Handsome Fruiteater Pipreola formosa Ochre-browed Thistletail Schizoeaca coryi Black-throated Spinetail Synallaxis castanea Orinoco Softtail Thripophaga cherriei White-throated Barbtail Premnoplex tatei Guttulated Foliage-gleaner Syndactyla guttulata Great Antpitta Grallaria excelsa Tachira Antpitta Grallaria chthonia Grey-naped Antpitta Grallaria griseonucha Scallop-breasted Antpitta Grallaricula loricata Caracas Tapaculo Scytalopus caracae Merida Wren Cistothorus meridae Yellow-faced Redstart Myioborus pariae White-faced Redstart Myioborus albifacies Saffron-breasted Redstart Myioborus cardonai White-fronted Redstart Myioborus albifrons Grey-headed Warbler Basileuterus griseiceps Grey-capped Hemispingus Hemispingus reyi Slaty-backed Hemispingus Hemispingus goeringi Rufous-cheeked Tanager Tangara rufigenis Duida Grass-Finch Emberizoides duidae Venezuelan Flower-piercer Diglossa venezuelensis Merida Flower-piercer Diglossa gloriosa

Checklist

Checklist

WebBirder Checklist

Fatbirder's very own checklists are now available through WebBirder

Useful Reading

Where to Watch Birds in South America

Nigel Wheatley Paperback - 336 pages (27 October, 1994) Christopher Helm

ISBN: 0713639091

Buy this book from NHBS.com

Birds of Venezuela

By Steven Hilty illustrated by John A. Gwynne & Guy Tudor Christopher Helm 2003

ISBN: 0713664185

Buy this book from NHBS.com

Site Guides: Venezuela

A Guide to the Best Birding Locations Dennis W Rogers 48 pages, maps. Cinclus 1993

ISBN: 0963776509

Buy this book from NHBS.com

A Birders Field Checklist of the Birds of Venezuela

D Sargeant 31 pages, tabs. 1994

ISBN: 41902

Buy this book from NHBS.com

Birding Venezuela 1995

Bruce C Forrester 35 pages, illus. 1995

ISBN: 55274

Buy this book from NHBS.com

The Birds of Cerro de la Neblina, Territorio Federal Amazonas, Venezuela

DE Willard et al Series: FIELDIANA: ZOOLOGY 65 80 pages, b/w photos, tabs, maps. Field Museum of Natural History 1991

ISBN: 38551

Buy this book from NHBS.com

Useful Information

National Bird

Troupial Icterus icterus

Guides & Tour Operators

Click on WAND for tours, guides, lodges and more…

Arassari Trek [formerly Bum Bum Tours]

Tour Operator

All our trips are highly educational and designed to give fair paid work to people living in remote areas. Ecological conscience and conservation of the environment are our main concerns to help preserve Venezuela as beautiful as it is right now.

Geodyssey

Tour Operator

You might choose to tour Venezuela staying in comfortable hotels and lodges with opportunities to explore each region. You might like to have an active holiday, going on an adventurous trek or a river journey deep in the more remote regions of Venezuela. You might be keen to see something of Venezuela`s huge diversity of birds and wildlife. Even if you prefer just to relax on a beautiful beach, Venezuela offers you a choice from lively beach-life to quiet Robinson Crusoe beaches fringed with palm trees. (There is also the tourist island of Margarita, which is best avoided if you would prefer to see the real Venezuela.)

Orinoco Tours

Tour Operator

Maria, Christophe et son équipe seront heureux de vous accueillir au Waro Waro Lodge. Profitez de notre longue expérience au Vénézuela. Venez observer les oiseaux, caimans, serpents, et dauphins d'eau douce lors d'excursions en bateau et pirogue sur un des nombreux bras qui composent le delta.

Footprint

Tour Operator

Footprint run regular birding tours to Venezuela.

Southwind Adventures

Tour Operator

Venezuela, South America`s Caribbean jewel, offers travelers an amazingly rich variety of experiences, and on this exciting trip we`ll enjoy the best of them! The country is a naturalist`s delight with more than 1,250 species of birds and more than 250 species of mammals!

Angel Eco-Tours

Tour Operator

The sound of hundreds of parrots awakening breaks the silence. You and your travel companions climb out of your beds to see the sunrise and experience the wonder that is Venezuela…

Mark Smith Nature Tours

Tour Operator

The Llanos is a distinctive region of northern South America, partly flooded half the year, and drying grasslands and pools the other half. The concentrations of waterfowl and wading birds are astonishing. Large animals like Capybara (world`s largest rodent) Caiman, Anaconda, Capuchin Monkey, Peccaries, Giant Anteater, Ocelot, and even Puma and Jaguar are seen with regularity. We stay four days at a large palatial ranch (Hato) in the heart of the Llanos.

Birding Pal

Information

Local birders willing to show visiting birders around their area…

Kolibri Expeditions

Tour Operator

Gunnar Engblom-Lima, Peru. Birdwatching in S. America. tele/fax +51 (0)1 476 50 16 cel: 9643 77 49 or 99007886 Kolibri Expeditions-Expediton Birding to the Endemic and Threatened Birds. Marvelous Spatuletail Tours-Spectacular Birding and Great Comfort. Email: kolibriexp@telefonica.net.pe. Birding Peru e-group: birdingperu-subscribe@yahoogroups.com Trip reports, recent sightings, travel tips, travel partners, range extensions, identification help, etc. http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Birdingperu

Natoura Adventure Tours

Tour Operator

Since its inception in 1986, NATOURA has remained a team of young and enthusiastic nature lovers, who specialize in organizing safe and exciting Eco & Adventure tours throughout our beautiful and diverse country…

Trogon Tours

Tour Operator

The Venezuelan Andes is the most northern part of the Andes. They are separated from the Colombian part by a wide gap. This makes that some of the high mountain birds evolved as endemics…

Fieldguides

Tour Operator

Venezuela has just about everything a birder could want in a visit to the Neotropics; a rich avifauna well illustrated in a newly published field guide, ample and diverse habitats and a well-maintained road system to reach them, modern facilities and friendly people…

Sunbird

Tour Operator

While entirely encompassed by the tropics, Venezuela contains a wide cross-section of habitats from lowland Amazonian rainforest through to barren, snow-capped Andean peaks…

Venezuela Nature Tours

Tour Operator

The only Venezuelan tours created and run by conservation biologists…

Ascanio Birding Tours

Tour Operator

whether you are an individual traveler or you like to join fellow birders, we can arrange a wide variety of birding tours to the famed Rancho Grande, the vast plains (Llanos), the Andes, the mountains of Paria, the Lake Maracaibo basin and the Tepuis. Over the years, we have found locations to look for the Roraiman Nightjar (our first record is back to 1984!), Scallop-breasted Antpitta, Recurve-billed Bushbird, Tepui Wren, Orinoco Softtail, Gray-headed Warbler, Great Antpitta and 3 yet undescribed birds among others…

Turpial Travel

Tour Operator

At the easy difficulty level, we have two different trips that allow you to experience the excitement of bird watching. Our Western Venezuela adventure begins in Caracas and spans eight days and seven nights and several different locations.

Trip Reports

Click on WAND for tours, guides, lodges and more…

CloudBirders

Trip Report Repository

CloudBirders was created by a group of Belgian world birding enthusiasts and went live on 21st of March 2013. They provide a large and growing database of birding trip reports, complemented with extensive search, voting and statistical features.

2008 [04 April] - Todd pepper

Report

…A number of Savannah Hawks were observed during the drive, as was a pair of Red & Green Macaw. Stopping on a bridge over a river we quickly ticked off Black-collared Swallow and Paradise Jacamar. Before checking into our cabins in Las Caritas we added Fulvous Crested Tanager, Masked Tanager, Tepui Swift, Chapman’s Swift, Black-necked Aracari, a heard only Capuchinbird and Red-necked Woodpecker. Overnight in Las Caritas…

2007 [03 March] - Didier Godreau

Report

This report covers a trip of 8 days in Venezuela, lats march 2007, and fully organised by local company lead by Chris Sharp (sharpebirder AT gmail.com). Our local guide was the excellent Pepe Clavijo…

2010 [02 February] - Dave Ferguson

Report

This was a short duration, high intensity tour which took in many of the habitats to the west of Caracas. We rose before dawn and usually breakfasted at the hotel while it was still dark. There was a two hour drive to the first hotel, where we spent a brief night, a five hour drive when we moved from the mountains to the coast, and a four-and-a-half hour drive from the coast back to Caracas. In between, drives from our two bases were less than an hour. Given the number of habitats we visited and the number of birds we saw it was a surprisingly less manic than some of our other holidays…

2013 [03 March] - David Ascanio

PDF Report

…Once in southern Venezuela, we started at the famous La Escalera Road in Sierra de Lema where we spent three days looking for many of the tepui endemic species, as well as the Guianan specialties. Sierra de Lema welcomed us with views of two male Guianan Cocks-of-the-rock, and later a surprising Tepui Tinamou walking close to our feet! Although day after day we collected an impressive number of tepui endemic species, I believe that Red-banded Fruiteater and Rose-collared Piha stood out as favorites for everyone….

2012 [09 September] - David Ascanio

PDF Report

…This was primarily a cultural trip and sure enough we nailed our objective. The prime target was to live with the Yanomami and for that we visited a new Shabono located in the Pasimoni river, named Pueblo Viejo…

2012 [05 May] - David Ascanio

PDF Report

…Once back to the main road it was time for the bright orange ball to appear when a male Guianan Cock-of-the-Rock flew over our heads and landed on a branch showing its magnificent plumage for few seconds. Before we decide to drive into higher grounds we found ourselves once more in the inside of the forest where we saw a male Roraiman Antbird calling softly while noticing the color of the legs as this is the main field mark (besides the voices) to tell apart from the lowland Spot-winged Antbird…

2013 [02 February] - Ralf Jahraus

PDF Report

This report covers a one month trip to Venezuela. My main purpose was to visit an ecological project of the Bonn based organization Oro Verde and its local partner Fundacion Thomas Merle at Carupano on the Paria Peninsular, this is also a good place to see some endemic bird species. In addition to this project I also visited a few selected places purely for birding including La Escalera, the Orinoco Delta and the Oilbird Cave near Caripe. All travelling throughout the trip was by public transport…

2013 [04 April] - Pete Morris

Report

…a superb selection of cotinga-like birds including the excellent Guianan Cock-of-the-Rock, the amazing Capuchinbird, colourful 1 BirdQuest Tour Report:Eastern Venezuela 2013 www.birdquest-tours.com Red-banded and Handsome Fruiteaters, Rose-collared Pihas, and brilliant White and Bearded Bellbird. We also saw a stunning selection of colourful manakins including the amazing Crimson-hooded Manakin, the out- rageous Scarlet-horned Manakin, and the localized Orange-bellied and White-throated Manakin…

2014 [02 February] - David Ascanio

PDF Report

A colorful welcome by a parade of tanagers, euphonias, and trogons was a wonderful way to begin this unique tour in the Neotropics where a myriad of tanagers, flycatchers, and waterbirds can be seen while looking for birds in a relaxed and easy style...

2014 [03 March] - David Ascanio

PDF Report

Our 2014 Eastern Venezuela tour began near the southern bank of the Orinoco River in Cachamay Park. Here, after much searching, we saw the beautiful Orinocan Saltator, our first target species. Exploring the edge of the dry and riverine forests, we added to our list several species that are common in the northern part of the country...

2015 [01 January] - David Ascanio

PDF Report

...Hato Piñero welcomed us with Scarlet Macaws in flight, and from the ground a Sunbittern gave its soft melody from the edge of a pond contiguous to the road. Also in attendance were a wood-rail, a tiger-heron, and a Green Ibis. As we drove across the ranch, hundreds of egrets and a nice mix of forested species rounded out an unforgettable first day in the llanos of Venezuela...

2015 [02 February] - David Ascanio

PDF Report

Our Casa Maria and Hato Piñero tour provided an incomparable mix of birds, mammals, and habitats unique to the Neotropics. This year we started in a different way: with views of Blue-and-yellow and Chestnut-fronted macaws flying over the valley of Caracas. We also enjoyed Orange-winged and Yellow-crowned parrots in flight, as well as the Roseringed Parakeet (introduced from Asia) commuting to the roosting site...

Places to Stay

Click on WAND for tours, guides, lodges and more…

Peacock Bay Lodge

Accommodation

Really for fishermen, but it might be a good base for others too.

Hato el Cedral

Accommodation

Hato El Cedral is located in the low plains of Venezuela`s Apure, near the town of Mantecal, in the country`s vast interior grasslands known as the llanos. Its 53,000 hectares (106,000 acres) are both a working cattle ranch with more than 20,000 head of cattle and an important tourist center for the growing interest in ecological and adventure tourism. This camp provides its visitors with one of the most outstanding displays of animal wildlife in the western hemisphere. In addition to being a working ranch, El Cedral is also considered an ecological reserve, and hundreds of species of wild animals run free. The wildlife here are unaware of the danger associated with man`s presence, because hunting has been banned for many years. El Cedral is the only ranch where animals are friendly and abundant, which distinguishes it as the best on the Venezuelan plains!

Ucaima Camp

Accommodation

This is the oldest of the camps in the area. Well known Rudy "Jungle Rudy" Truffino built his camp in Ucaima, a few minutes by jeep upriver from Canaima on the banks of the Carrao River in the 1950's. It is now operated by his daughters who provide warm, friendly service to the guests and are always available for chatting with guests about the beauty of the Lost World region. Encounters there included half a dozen resident black-capped parrots, a baby giant anteater, a tapir, a resident macaw, and a friendly boa constrictor

Orinoco Delta Lodge

Accommodation

Is a family run operation specialized in nature and adventure travel in The Orinoco Delta Region in Venezuela with offices in Tucupita and Playa el Agua in Margarita Island…

Casa Vieja Merida

Accommodation

The Posada Casa Vieja Merida is situated in the Venezuelan Andes, at the calm Andean community of Tabay which 11 kilometers away from the vivid city of Mérida. Close to the Posada Casa Vieja is the Sierra Nevada national park where the famous Humboldt Trail is located. In this cloud forest lives a big avifauna and Trogons, Quetzals, Hummingbirds, Tanager, Antbirds, etc … can be seen easy. Joe Klaiber lives there with his family and organized daily bird watching excursions in the area www.birds-venezuela.de

Organisations

Venezuelan Audubon Society

Website

Apartado No. 80450, Caracas 1080-A. +58 2 9922812 mailto:audubon@cantv.net
The Society operates a shop in Caracas, offering books and publications on Venezuelan animals, birds, and plants, as well as maps and guide books to the several ecological regions. A knowledgable staff can answer questions about Venezuela and its National Parks and Preserves…

Sociedad Conservacionista de Venezuela

Website

Sociedad Conservacionista de Venezuela
President: Clemencia Rodner, Apartado 80450, Caracas, DF 1080-A, Venezuela Tel: 58/212-992-28-12 Fax: 58/212-991-07-16 EMail: presidencia@audubondevenezuela.org

Fundacion Grupo Ecologico Bolivar - GREBO

Fundacion Grupo Ecologico Bolivar - GREBO
Apdo. 527, UDO La Sabanita, Ciudad Bolivar, VENEZUELA Tel: 58 854 0361 Fax: 58 854 0361 Email: luisalva@telcel.net.ve

Observatories

La Mucuy Bird Observatory

Satellite View

Located in the Mérida Mountains, Sierra Nevada National Park, Venezuela - Although Venezuela is not widely recognized as an important place for Neotropical migrant birds, its importance appears to be underestimated…

Reserves

Parque Nacional Henri Pittier

Information

Satellite View

This is the country's oldest park, originally created in 1937 as Rancho Grande, and renamed in 1953 in honor of the prestigious Swiss geographer, botanist and ethnologist who arrived in Venezuela in 1917 and classified more than 30,000 plants in the country. Henri Francois Pittier has the honor of having started the history of National Parks in Venezuela.

Estacion Biologica El Frio

Article

Satellite View

The biological station and visitor facilities are located in the heart of El Frío ranch, about 90 miles west of San Fernando de Apure, in Apure state, Venezuela. Located on both sides of the San Fernando-Mantecal road, El Frío encompasses about 200,000 acres. The site is a functioning cattle ranch, which supports 45,000 head of cattle and 1,000 horses. Combining its cattle raising activity with research and ecotourism, Hato El Frío represents one of the best examples of the ecosystems of the flooded llanos. Beyond the ubiquitous spectacled caimans and capybaras, the ranch is home to large flocks of herons, ibises, and storks that congregate around watering holes. El Frío is actively involved in conservation issues, serving as a breeding station for rare Orinoco crocodiles.

National Parks - by State

Website

a page for each…

Parque Nacional Cerro El Copey - Jovito Villalba

Webpage

Satellite View

It is strange that a park of such importance as a refuge for endemic and threatened species should not be studied more thoroughly, especially with respects to biodiversity inventories of invertebrates and other taxa…

Parque Nacional Yacambú

Webpage

Satellite View

Yacambú National Park is in the state of Lara, on the southern slope of the Portuguesa Cordillera, which is part of the northern Andes range. The park was created in 1962 to protect the watershed of the Yacambú River, whose waters will feed the José María Ochoa Pilé reservoir once dam construction is complete…

Los Llanos Grasslands

More than 400 species of birds speckle the grasslands with white, crimson, yellow, blue, orange and black. Scarlet Ibis, chestnut-fronted Macaws, Jabiru Storks, black-collared Hawks, as well as the prehistoric-looking Hoatzin, call it their home. The Llanos also shelter a wide array of other animals such as giant anteaters, wild horses, armadillos, iguanas, tortoises, red howler and capuchin monkeys…

Hato Pinero Wildlife Reserve

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Hato Piñero has for almost 50 years, been a unique example of agricultural development, through the use of the most advanced techniques and practices in agricultural and livestock husbandry, yet conserving nature in its natural state...

Parque Nacional Cerro Saroche

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The park is located within a large semi-arid region in the Carora Depression in northwester Venezuela, with a terrain characterized by rolling hills, plains and mountains that range in altitude between 300 and 1300 m. The park covers an area of 32,294 ha.

Parque Nacional Cueva de la Quebrada del Toro

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The landscape presents a rugged topography, highlighting a series of reef limestone cliffs that formed in a marine basin during the Miocene 25 to 13 million years ago. On the southern side of the plateau is the Cave of Quebrada El Toro, which encloses some small caverns like the Catalina Passage, a cave that crosses from end to end that sector of the hill.

Parque Nacional Tirgua

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The Tirgua National Park (officially General Manuel Manrique National Park ) aims to protect water sources that originate nearby, especially the Tirgua river, which gives its name to the park.

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Birds of Venezuela

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Bird Songs International B.V. proudly presents its third CD-ROM: Birds of Venezuela / Aves de Venezuela, by Peter Boesman! This revolutionary CD-ROM for Windows contains 700 photographs, almost 1300 sound recordings (more than 7.5 hours!); and a complete set of distribution maps of 878 bird species. Everything presented in an extremely user-friendly format: any sound recording, any photo is seconds away, accessible by just a few keyclicks!

Birding in Venezuela

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Venezuela is, besides Colombia and Peru, the world`s richest country in birds. Venezuela is pure nature. It`s a combined country with complete vegetation`s level. The highest concentration is found, at a certain point, in Mérida: it goes northern from 5000mts in the Andes to the Caribbean and southern to the Amazon through elfy- and cloud forests over gallery forests, savannahs swamps, dryforest, deltas, tropical rain forests and the table top mountains.

Venezuela Yours… Nature

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Those large black birds, with long, sharp and extended wings, showing a whitish or intense red colored swollen throat, are the Frigate Birds, the ’"always there’" black shore birds that sail the high blue sky for hours every day…

Venezuelan Birds

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Venezuela! A birders paradise…

Birding in Venezuela

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An Ornithological and birding tour in Venezuela has not only a great variety of the bird species but it is also impressive because of its nature. Venezuela has different vegetation levels and a biodiversity which includes the local birds as well as the winter visitors of North and South America.

Visiting Birders

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Suggestions for anyone contemplating a birding trip to Venezuela… Pdf format

Aves de Venezuela

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Aqui encontrará la información que necesita acerca de la distribución de las aves de Venezuela, sus cantos, las publicaciones y sus autores, y otros datos de interés…

Checklist Birds of Venezuela

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