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State of New Jersey

EGoldfinch
Eastern Goldfinch Carduelis tristis ©Mike's Birds Website

In all seasons, New Jersey is truly a birders state. The Jersey landscape includes wetlands, deciduous forests, meadows, coastal beaches, and the famous Pine Barrens. The state's diversity of habitat attracts a wide variety of migrating and breeding birds, not to mention some elusive rarities.

Spring is highlighted by the avian pallette of colors brought by prothonatary warblers, scarlet tanagers, and the other returning Neotropical migrants to areas like Belleplain State Forest, Princeton Institute Woods, and Garret Mountain. This wonderful time of year offers many other birding joys such as the Sandy Hook Hawkwatch and the shorebird spectacle of red knots and ruddy turnstones on the Delaware Bayshore.

Summer is the time to find our many breeding birds in areas such as Great Swamp NWR, Glassboro Woods WMA, and Assunpink WMA. The season is not complete without a visit to Stone Harbor Point. At mudflats and sod farms around the state, the southbound shorebird search for upland sandpiper, buff breasted sandpiper, and others is already beginning.

With its stellar hawkwatch and songbird migration, Cape May is deservedly the hub of East Coast birding in the fall. Yet, there are many other autumn treasures including Palmyra Cove and Liberty State Park.

For some, the birding really gets hot in the winter. The wintering raptors at Jake's Landing and Manahawkin WMA are a hawkwatcher's delight. The influx of waterfowl species is worth a trip to the state's many lakes, rivers, and coastal viewing areas.

Even though it is one of the smallest US states, the birding opportunities are virtually endless. From Brigantine's Edwin B. Forsythe NWR to Pedricktown Marsh to High Point State Park to countless other hot spots, there are always more than a few good places to bird on any given day in New Jersey.

Top Sites

Cape May

Webpage

Satellite View

The city of Cape May in Cape May County, which comprises the southern-most tip of New Jersey, is THE birdiest place in the state. It is the home of the Cape May Bird Observatory and the Cape May Hawk Watch. The Victorian city itself is a lovely place to take a vacation (Spring, Summer and Autumn are best – rates are cheaper in Spring and Autumn). The annual World Series of Birding takes place here every May (the teams try to see how many species they can see in a 24-hour period birding entirely within the borders of the state, although there are now categories for Cape May County alone, and for a Big Sit too, as well as others). Birds to be seen at the Hawk Watch depends on the month. Broad Winged Hawks come through in September. Bald Eagles are seen in Sept. and Oct. (but now that these eagles are much more common in New Jersey, they are possible almost any month) and Golden Eagles (if seen at all) would be seen in Nov. More commonly seen are Sharp-shinned and Cooper’s Hawks, Northern Harriers (a/k/a Hen Harrier), both Black and Turkey Vultures, Red-shouldered and Red-tailed Hawks, Peregrine Falcon, Merlin and American Kestrels. Rarities are amazingly common and not limited to raptors (Swallow-tailed and Mississippi Kites, Anhingas, Wood Storks, etc. have all been sighted here recently). The Cape May Point neighborhood just outside Cape May Point State Park is a very birdy area. Many homes keep bird feeders that attract a wealth of birds (including the latest introduced species that is expanding its range in North America, Eurasian Collared Dove!). The beaches on the south tip of the peninsula can be very rewarding especially during migration or during or after a storm. Another site for raptors is the tower at Higbee Beach Wildlife Management Area (“WMA”) (located at the end of New England Road - Google coordinates 38.961582,-74.960178). The WMA itself is very good for migrating birds in Spring and Autumn. The Nature Conservancy’s Cape May Meadows (parking lot located on the south side of Sunset Boulevard about half way between West Cape May and Cape May Point – Google coordinates 38.938416,-74.944538) is a beach and dune habitat providing nesting areas for the endangered Piping Plover. A system of ponds amid the dunes provide habitat for migrating shorebirds in Autumn. The nearby town of Avalon has a Seawatch where one can observe the migration of seabirds in Autumn. The Seawatch is located at the end of 7th Street and the beach in north Avalon (Google coordinates 38.109388,-74.708018.) There are many other birding sites in the area and one should consult Boyle’s “A Guide to Bird-finding in New Jersey” for more information.

Edwin B. Forsythe NWR

Webpage

Satellite View

Also known as Brigantine National Wildlife Refuge and located in Galloway Township just north of Atlantic City, the refuge visitor’s center is located on Great Creek Road near the coast on the Atlantic Ocean (Google coordinates 39.465031,-74.448273). A wildlife drive takes one around a series of dykes and ponds. Spring and Fall are best. (Summer is incredibly hot and humid with biting green flies and mosquitoes in abundance – insect repellant is a must!!) Fall migration is liable to bring any number of rarities to the refuge. Conditions are best when the tide is out as then mud flats are exposed. A spotting scope is also recommended for this refuge. All the commonly seen shorebirds are possible here. Terns seen include Least, Common, Fosters, Gull-billed, and in migration Royal, Caspian and Black. Common birds include Wood Duck, Black Skimmers, Black-crowned Night-herons, Great Blue and Little Blue Herons, Great and Snowy Egrets, Clapper Rail, Marsh Wren, Purple Martins (there is a colony near the visitor’s center), Swamp, Seaside, and Saltmarsh Sharp-tailed Sparrows, and Blue Grosbeak. Least Bittern is regularly seen from the Observation Tower. It is not unusual to see Bald Eagle and Peregrine Falcon (the latter nest on a tower in the east end of the refuge).

Garret Mountain Reservation

Information

Satellite View

This Passaic County Park located in the Watchung Mountains just south-west of the city of Paterson is a prime birding site in Spring. (Google coordinates 40.902238,-74.181334.) The areas to bird include: the paths surrounding Barbour Pond – look for migrant warblers and other birds such as Downy and Hairy Woodpeckers, Tufted Titmouse, Black-capped Chickadee, White-breasted Nuthatch, Brown Thrasher, Eastern Towhee, Chipping and Song Sparrows, as well as waterfowl on the pond. In the woodlands at the north and south ends of the pond look for Wood Thrush and Veery. Near the southern end of the pond is a gazebo where a small stream enters the pond. Eastern Phoebes nest under the bridge by the stream and Louisiana Waterthrush is common in the area along the stream to the south. This is also a good site for Winter Wren which overwinters here. Wilson Avenue which extends from Mountain Avenue off the west side of the reservation. Pine Warbler can be found here (in the pines) along with other warbler species as well as both Golden-crowned and Ruby-crowned Kinglets. It is always worth walking down this short street as you never know what you’ll find here. Look for Common Mergansers on the New Street Reservoir. At the very north end of the park is an overlook providing a splendid view of the city of Paterson. If you have time, by all means take a trip into Paterson itself to see the Great Falls of the Passaic, one of the natural wonders of New Jersey. It is located at McBride and Wayne Avenues in Paterson (Google location 40.915345,-74.179961). The falls and Passaic River’s reliable source of water power led to the area being a key site during the industrial revolution in America. The area is now a National Historic Park and there is a visitor’s center across McBride Avenue from the falls parking area. [At nearby Rifle Camp Park (just to the south of Garret Mountain) one can see Wild Turkeys very easily.]

Sandy Hook

Website

Satellite View

A part of Gateway National Recreation Area, Sandy Hook is on a peninsula extending north from the Atlantic Highlands on coast into Raritan Bay. (Google coordinates are 40.468482,-74.008305.) In the summer a fee is charged from Memorial Day (the last Monday in May) to Labor Day (the first Monday in September). You don’t have to pay this fee to bird the area – just tell the attendant that you are going birding and they will allow you to enter free and will be allowed to park at the Visitor’s Center, Horseshoe Cove, Boy Scout Camp, all Fort Hancock lots and K-Lot and the Sandy Hook Bird Observatory. However, if you want to park at any of the beach parking areas, you will have to pay the fee. One could bird here all year round, but Spring, Fall and Winter are best. There is extensive forest on the peninsula and the plants there attract many species that overwinter, including many rarities. Recent years have seen Bohemian Waxwings, Common Redpolls, Pine Siskins, Orange-crowned Warblers, etc. Winter also brings King Eider and Barrow’s Goldeneye (usually seen each winter) as well as Bonaparte’s Gulls, Northern Gannets, all three scoter species, Snow Buntings and Horned Larks. North of K-Lot is a hawk-watch platform overlooking the north tip of the peninsula. A walk out to the beach here can be rewarding in Fall for migrating shorebirds. The Observatory has a small book store and restrooms are located in the parking lot outside which facilities are open year-round.

Worthington State Forest & Delaware Water Gap National Recreation Area

Webpage

Satellite View

These two areas are treated together as they are contiguous to each other. To reach them take Interstate 80 (“I-80”) west to Exit 1 where it meets New Jersey’s western border, the Delaware River. (Google coordinates 40.977857,-75.134082.) (In doing so, you have to drive through the Delaware Water Gap which is another of New Jersey’s natural wonders, a place where the Delaware River actually wore down the rising bedrock forming a spectacular, meandering gorge.) There is a small visitors center and picnic grounds on the south side of I-80. At the bottom of the exit ramp from I-80, turn right. You may have to wait for the traffic light as the beginning of this road is one way as it is very narrow. Worthington State Forest is the first area you will explore. The best times are Spring and Early Summer. The road is closed in Winter. I suggest one read the description of these areas in Boyle’s “A Guide to Bird-Finding in New Jersey” as it is too much information to present here. Birds found all along this area include Wild Turkey, Osprey, Bald Eagle (there is a nest across the river on the Shawnee Inn Golf Course in Pennsylvania that is visible from the south end of the Worthington Campground), Broad-winged, Red-shouldered and Red-tailed Hawks, Killdeer, Spotted and Solitary Sandpiper, Yellow-billed and Black-billed Cuckoos, Ruby-throated Hummingbird, Belted Kingfisher, Red-bellied, Downy, Hairy and Pileated Woodpecker, Eastern Wood-Pewee, Acadian and Least Flycatcher, Eastern Phoebe, Great Crested Flycatcher, Eastern Kingbird, Yellow-throated, Warbling, and Red-eyed Vireos, Northern Rough-winged, Tree, Bank, and Barn Swallows, Black-capped Chickadee, Tufted Titmouse, White-breasted Nuthatch, Carolina and House Wrens, Blue-gray Gnatcatcher, Eastern Bluebird, Veery, Wood Thrush, Cedar Waxwing, Blue-winged, Nashville, Yellow, Chestnut-sided, Black-throated Blue, Yellow-rumped, Black-throated Green, Pine, Cerulean, Black-and-White, Hooded, Worm-eating Warblers, Northern Parula, American Redstart, Ovenbird, Louisiana Waterthrush, Common Yellowthroat, Eastern Towhee, Chipping, Field, Song and White-throated Sparrows, Scarlet Tanager, Rose-breasted Grosbeak, Indigo Bunting, Orchard and Baltimore Orioles, etc. Note that this area is one of the best in the state for sightings of Black Bear! Usually these creatures are shy. However, if on foot, do not approach a bear, ever! Viewing them from the safety of your automobile is recommended.

Contributor

John J. Collins

Top Sites Section

Raritan, NJ

jjcbird@verizon.net

Dave Magpiong

Dayvm@aol.com

Number of Species

Number of bird species: 477

As at November 2016

Checklist

iGoTerra Checklist

iGoTerra Checklist

Fatbirder Associate iGoTerra offers the most comprehensive and up to date birds lists on the web

Useful Reading

A Guide to Bird-Finding in New Jersey

William J Boyle 492 pages, b/w illus, maps. Rutgers University Press 2002

ISBN: 0813530857

Buy this book from NHBS.com

Birding the Delaware Valley Region

- A Comprehensive Guide to Birdwatching in Southeastern Pennsylvania, Central and Southern New Jersey and Northcentral
Paperback - 223 pages (May 1980) Temple University Press

ISBN: 0877221820

Buy this book from NHBS.com

National Geographic Field Guide to Birds: New Jersey

Mel Baughman Series: NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC STATE FIELD GUIDES TO BIRDS 272 pages, maps, photos, drawings. National Geographic Society 2005

ISBN: 0792238753

Buy this book from NHBS.com

New Jersey Birds : An Introduction to Familiar Species

(Pocket Naturalist)Waterford PressPaperback (March 1999) Waterford Press

ISBN: 1889903825

Buy this book from NHBS.com

The Birds of New Jersey: Status and Distribution

By William J Boyle | 308 pages | 202 colour photos | 460 maps | Princeton University Press Softcover | 2011
See Fatbirder Review

ISBN: 9780691144108

Buy this book from NHBS.com

Useful Information

State Bird

Eastern Goldfinch Carduelis tristis

Guides & Tour Operators

Click on WAND for tours, guides, lodges and more…

Birding Pal

Information

Local birders willing to show visiting birders around their area…

NJ Audubon

Guides

Contact the local Audubon chapter for guides…

Trip Reports

Click on WAND for tours, guides, lodges and more…

CloudBirders

Trip Report Repository

CloudBirders was created by a group of Belgian world birding enthusiasts and went live on 21st of March 2013. They provide a large and growing database of birding trip reports, complemented with extensive search, voting and statistical features.

2010 [09 September] - Hans-Åke Gustavsson & Kristian Svensson - Cape May & Delaware

Report PDF

…This trip report contains the bird observations made during a visit to mainly the Cape May area in New Jersey in September 2010. As we both consider ourselves as regulars at Falsterbo, one of the top sites for watching diurnal migration of raptors and passerines in Europe, we wanted to get the experience of visiting one of the counterpart localities on the other side of the Atlantic Ocean. The trip was therefore focused on seeing as many birds as possible, especially wood warblers, during peak migration time..

2012 [09 September] - Louise Zemaitis - Cape May & Bombay

Report PDF

…By the end of the day we had tallied 14 species including many Black-and-white Warblers, American Redstarts, and Northern Parulas. Particularly superb views were had of Cape May and Black- throated Green warblers in the trees near Lily Lake, and eye level Bay-breasted and Blackburnian warblers at Cape May Point State Park. Warblers were our constant companions throughout the day as we looked to the sky for hawks, the Delaware Bay for gulls and terns, and everywhere else for Monarchs. By afternoon, we found ourselves in a river of Monarchs in Cape May Point…

2012 [10 October] - Louise Zemaitis - Cape May & Bombay

Report PDF

…Fall migration is driven by weather. Birders’ conversations inevitably turn to the weather’s relativity to yesterday, today, or tomorrow’s birding. When will the cold front arrive? Will the winds hold from the northwest? Gosh, I hope that it doesn’t rain. Our tour began with fog. Yes, fog in September. Quite unusual, but it set the scene for a wonderful week in Cape May and Bombay Hook. For each morning’s fog brought very little rain, mild temperatures, and fine afternoons. Oh, and unpredictably good birding!…

2012 [10 October] - Megan Crewe

Report

…the fronts brought thousands and thousands of birds spilling south in their wakes. Flocks of sparrows kept the fields at Higbee's in constant motion, while restless groups of Pine Siskins (an irruptive migrant here) and American Goldfinches bounded from sunflower heads to nearby trees and back. Tree Swallows gathered in whirling tornadoes over the marshes…

2013 [05 May] - Louise Zemaitis - Cape May

Report PDF

… It was a morning filled with primary colors: blue (Blue Grosbeak and Indigo Bunting), yellow (Prairie Warbler and Yellow Warbler), and red (Summer and Scarlet tanagers, Rose-breasted Grosbeak, and 3 Red-headed Woodpeckers!). A particular highlight among the many migrants was a lovely little Chestnut-sided Warbler, ignoring us as it fed close to the path…

2013 [09 September] - Peregrine Bird Tours

Report

…Our best day for observing large numbers of migrants on passage, occurred one afternoon at South Cape May Meadows, when we watched a very large migration of raptors, which included large numbers of Sharp-shinned Hawks, Ospreys, American Kestrels and Merlins. With smaller numbers of both Black and Turkey Vultures, Cooper's Hawks, Bald Eagles, Northern Harriers and Peregrine Falcons…

2013 [10 October] - Megan Edwards Crewe

Report

…An American Golden-Plover pattered on a muddy pond edge. A Parasitic Jaeger, probably feeling more than a bit "off" rested on a sandy beach, allowing close approach. A Peregrine Falcon repeatedly dive-bombed a Common Nighthawk. A Western Sandpiper, sporting bright rusty lines on its scapular feathers, mingled with a big group of Semipalmated Sandpipers (and one Ruddy Turnstone) on a stony jetty…

2014 [02 February] - Tony Davison

PDF Report

More a list with (excellent) photographs…

2014 [09 September] - Louise Zemaitis - Cape May

PDF Report

...Some raptors, such as Merlin, Peregrine Falcon, and Osprey, while others such as American Kestrel and Sharp-shinned Hawk tend to hug the dunes and travel varying distances up the bayshore before crossing...

2014 [10 October] - Megan Crewe & Tom Johnson - Cape May Megan's Way II

Report

...a nocturnal takeoff of epic proportions took place, with hundreds of American Bitterns, Black-crowned Night-Herons, Great Blue Herons, and other birds taking to the sky over Cape May...

2014 [10 October] - Megan Edwards Crewe & Tom Johnson - Cape May Megan's Way I

Report

...Tops in the rarities department was a Common Raven -- only the 6th modern record for the county -- that circled around the Cape May Light during lunch one afternoon. But there were other less-expected species as well. A spangled American Golden-Plover picked its way along a sandy beach among a host of Black-bellied Plovers (and a snoozing female Red-breasted Merganser). An early White-winged Scoter zoomed by with a group of Black Scoters off the seawatch point in Avalon, and early Surf Scoters bobbed in the surf off several Cape May beaches. A Clay-colored Sparrow popped up in a grassy fringe at Forsythe NWR, and a Vesper Sparrow rummaged along the edge of a path at the Meadows. Two Nelson's Sparrows nibbled seeds is waving Spartina grasses along a salt marsh channel....

2015 [05 May] - Louise Zemaitis - Cape may

Report PDF

...We were heartened to see the beach covered with Red Knots and Semipalmated Sandpipers, species that have been severely impacted by declining numbers of Horseshoe Crabs. We turned around to see the marsh dotted with singing Seaside Sparrows.

2015 [05 May] - Megan Crewe & Tom Johnson - Cape May

Report

...The breeding birds of Cape May always delight, and we had a great time soaking in the colorful songbirds at Belleplain State Forest. Remember the Worm-eating Warbler, Hooded Warbler, and Acadian Flycatcher in the scope? We also spent time with wetland breeders in the imperiled Atlantic salt marshes near Wildwood, where we found Saltmarsh Sparrow and Clapper Rail in addition to many terns and herons.

2015 [09 September] - Louise Zemaitis

PDF Report

...we watched raptors and songbirds as they chose whether or not to make the Delaware Bay crossing. Vulnerable American Kestrels turned the corner and headed north, seeking a safer route. A river of swallows followed the same path, with songbirds and accipiters in the mix. More powerful Ospreys, Northern Harriers, and Bald Eagles stuck to their flight paths directly across the bay...

2015 [10 October] - Megan Edwards Crewe

Report

...A Clapper Rail stood on the edge of a channel and belted out his song. A mixed mob of Indigo Buntings and sparrows (White-throated, Song, Swamp, Chipping, Savanna, and an unexpected Clay-colored) bounced through the flower beds at the Stone Harbor Bird Sanctuary, providing an impromptu "sparrow master class." A Marsh Wren perched in the open...

2015 [10 October] - Megan Edwards Crewe

Report

...A big flock of Black Skimmers rested on the sandy beach across from our hotel. A conveniently mixed flock of Least and Semipalmated sandpipers poked and prodded for tidbits literally under our feet on a rocky jetty...

2016 [04 April] - Jaap Westra - Eastern North America

PDF Report

...an early morning walk through suburban Hasbrouck Heights, New Jersey. A singing Northern Mockingbird was the first bird I saw, soon followed by Mourning Doves, lots of American Robins and a singing Song Sparrow...

2016 [05 May] - Louise Zemaitis

PDF Report

...After lunch, with light westerly winds blowing, the group headed to Cape Island in search of diurnal migrants. Hawk-watching at the Rea Farm produced Bald Eagle and Cooper’s Hawk, and at Cape May Point State Park we worked on swallow identification in the midst of a bustling Purple Martin colony...

2016 [05 May] - Tom Johnson & Doug Gochfeld

Report

his running of our spring tour took advantage of an unusually strong spring warbler migration here, and we were able to enjoy awesome views of Blackburnian, Cape May, and Bay-breasted Warblers in addition to more expected breeders like Worm-eating, Black-and-white, and Yellow-throated Warblers. The male Bay-breasted Warbler feeding in the trees with the nesting Yellow-crowned Night-Herons in Wildwood stands out as a particular highlight.

2016 [09 September] - Louise Zemaitis

PDF Report

...Other morning highlights included a shrub filled with Marsh Wrens and Common Yellowthroats, a couple of flyover Wilson’s Snipe, and a handsome male Ring-necked Pheasant....

2016 [09 September] - Megan Edwards Crewe

Report

...we found 16 species of warblers, including a busy mob of Nashvilles bouncing in and out of the millet field at Higbee's, a late Blackburnian flicking through a cedar at Higbee's, a Cape May Warbler and the tour's only Black-throated Green in a mixed flock near CMBO's Northwood Center, and a Prairie Warbler flitting along the edge of the parking lot at Cape May Point SP...

2016 [10 October] - Megan Edwards Crewe & Cory Gregory - Cape May

Report

...A White-rumped Sandpiper scuttled through shallow water. A Clapper Rail crept along the edge of a marsh, then plunged in and swam across a channel. In all, we found 17 species of warblers, including a very late male Golden-winged, some knee-high Black-throated Blues flitting along the edge of the road, an Orange-crowned hunting along a weedy field edge, a skulking (but ultimately showy) Mourning Warbler, and a bright male Pine Warbler that danced through through the pine needles...

Places to Stay

Click on WAND for tours, guides, lodges and more…

Avondale By The Sea

Accommodation

…in the heart of Cape May…

Northwood Inn B&B

Accommodation

Leamings Run Gardens & Colonial Farm - Open May through October. Rt. 9, Cape May Court House. Largest annual garden in the USA. Haven for humming birds in August…

Southern Mansion B&B

Accommodation

The famous Cape May wildlife preserve is unparalleled for the huge quantity and variety of birds for the bird watchers to delight in.

The Woolverton Inn B&B

Accommodation

Nestled on a ten-acre estate of century old maple trees, surrounded by 400 acres of rolling farmland and forest…

Organisations

Atlantic Audubon Society

Website

Our mission : Increase public knowledge and awareness of environmental issues; provide an avenue for participation in governmental policy; work toward the preservation and sustainability of natural ecosystems; promote an appreciation of the natural environment.

Audubon Society in New Jersey

Website

A list of all the chapters of the Audubon Society in New Jersey…

Bergen County Audubon Society

Website

Serving the communities of Northern New Jersey

Fyke Nature Association

Website

Fyke was founded in 1952 by a group of people strongly dedicated to saving undeveloped tracts of land in Bergen County, New Jersey as nature preserves. Since its founding, Fyke has not only been a force for preservation, but a forum where people can educate themselves and share their love of the natural world. Currently, the Association, along with the Borough of Allendale, co-manage the Celery Farm Natural Area in Allendale, NJ. Together, we have been instrumental in keeping the Celery Farm, a 107-acre freshwater wetland, in its natural state. As a result, fifty-three bird species breed here, and a total checklist of 225+ have been recorded…

Great Swamp Watershed Association

Website

Great Swamp Watershed Association was created in 1981 to protect the Great Swamp watershed basin. The association acts as steward for this valuable and sensitive region in northern New Jersey…

Highlands Audubon Society

Serving the communities of Passiac and Sussex Counties and Northwest NJ

Monmouth County Audubon Society

Website

The Monmouth County Audubon Society, a chapter of the National Audubon Society, is dedicated to the enjoyment and study of nature, wildlife conservation, habitat protection, and education.

Morris Highlands Audubon Society

PO Box 935, Denville, NJ 07834 - John Knapp, President

Nature Conservancy in New Jersey

Website

Check out the Fall photo of William L. Hutcheson Memorial Forest on the opening page. The Nature Conservancy has been working to protect New Jersey's natural areas since 1955, when it helped save one of the mid-Atlantic's last primeval forests. Hutcheson Memorial Forest's old fields and 60-foot-tall stands of hardwoods now span 500 acres. The forest is the birthplace of the Conservancy in the Garden State…

New Jersey Audubon

Website

The New Jersey Audubon Society (NJAS) is a privately supported, not-for profit, state-wide membership organization. Founded in 1897, and one of the oldest independent Audubon societies, NJAS has no connection with the National Audubon Society. The New Jersey Audubon Society fosters environmental awareness and a conservation ethic among New Jersey`s citizens; protects New Jersey`s birds, mammals, other animals, and plants, especially endangered and threatened species; and promotes preservation of New Jersey`s valuable natural habitats.

New Jersey Bird Records Committee

Website

During a recent conversation with a fellow birder, I asked him to submit to the New Jersey Bird Records Committee (N.J.B.R.C.) a written report of a rarity he had just found. His blunt reply, What? ! So you can tell me if I was correct in my identification! caught me by surprise. Who were we, the N.J.B.R.C., to tell him whether or not he'd correctly identified this bird! Do you feel the same way as this birder? Many people do. We'd like to try to dispel the myth that our major purpose is to vet your rare bird reports. Looks like this is a universal problem…

Washington Crossing Audubon Society

Website

Better than the usual site which just lists officers and meeting dates it carries reports such as… A Biological Survey of the Pole Farm, presented by WCAS to members of the Mercer County Park Northwest steering committee at its public meeting held on October 22, 1998.

Wetlands Institute

Website

Come discover why The Wetlands Institute of Stone Harbor, NJ is “The Natural Place Where Learning is Fun!” At the Wetlands Institute, we promote the conservation and preservation of coastal ecosystems by providing a fun and educational experience for families, school groups and vacationers of all ages. As you browse through our site, you will see the many attractions we offer to visitors, as well as the extensive array of educational programs available throughout the year.

Festivals

Fall Migration Festival

Webpage

Sitting in the heart of the Atlantic Flyway, thousands of birds make their way across the Cape May Peninsula every fall. In a single day one can go from spotting a Peregrine Falcon flying low along the salt marsh to watching flocks of White-winged Scoters migrate along the ocean front. The sheer abundance and diversity of species migrating through the Cape May Peninsula is an amazing sight to see. This combination therefore makes it among the top birding destinations in the world and a top birding destination in North America.…

May Day Festival

Website

Treat Mom to a Day with Mother Earth on Saturday May 7! Surprise her with a “Mother Nature’s Silent Auction” gift – place your bids for tickets to McCarter, NJ Shakespeare, or Mayo Theatre – or an overnight stay for 2 at Dolce Hotel… maybe she’d prefer a basket from C’est Cheese or Enjou Chocolat – just to mention a few of the many, many wonderful gifts available for you to win… while supporting the Sanctuary at the same time.

Find amazing creatures along a Nature Treasure Hunt, peruse gorgeous wildlife photography in the Wayrick Wildlife Gallery and meet the artist herself! And don’t forget to visit the Young Audubon Children’s Art Show featuring the works of talented 4th Graders from area schools! Young Audubon work will be on display just outside the Sanctuary Nature Store until June 1st.

And speaking of the Nature Store, every May Day guest - not just Moms - will receive a Special May Day/Mother’s Day 20% off Discount to apply to virtually everything (except optics) in the beautiful new store!

Relax and enjoy live outdoor performances by Eco-Man and the talented musicians of the NJ Folk Project while the kids get their faces painted and are busy with nature crafts at The Children’s Tent – or sit in on talks by very special guest speakers, including every Jersey birder’s favorite and renowned author, Pete Dunne; Giselle Smisko will talk about Chimney Swifts, why they are on the decline, and how they can be helped. History buffs will be treated to a fascinating and entertaining Hike through History with Gordon T. Ward – enjoy nature while learning about the critical role the Sanctuary grounds played in the American Revolution. And for Moms who aren’t easily grossed-out, Rizzo’s Reptiles will be on hand with a wild posse of snakes, reptiles and amphibians – and even a baby alligator! Bring your family and friends to this festive annual event where you’ll discover a place where experiencing nature is pure fun.

Questions? Please call Mike Anderson, Director of Scherman Hoffman Wildlife Sanctuary, Laurie Sindlinger, Naturalist (908) 766-5787 or Kathleen Mistretta, NJA May Day Coordinator (908) 204-8998 x10.

World Series of Birding

Webpage

…The Big Day tradition goes all the way to Charlie Urner and Ludlow Griscom who pioneered this brand of birding madness back in the 20s and 30s. This tradition was the foundation of the World Series. Since the first World Series, thousands of avid birders have taken the challenge and followed in Urner and Griscom’s footsteps. Birders like Roger Tory Peterson, Kenn Kaufman, Ted Parker, and David Sibley to name just a few. When you earn the privilege of calling yourself a World Series of Birding veteran, you’ll find yourself in some pretty good company…

Observatories

Cape May Bird Observatory

Observatory Website

Satellite View

Founded in 1975 by the New Jersey Audubon Society, the Cape May Bird Observatory (CMBO) is a leader in research, environmental education, bird conservation, and recreational birding activities. Our mission: to understand and instill appreciation of the needs of resident and migrating birds so that human ambitions do not undermine them.

Chimney Rock Hawk Watch

Observatory Website

Satellite View

The Chimney Rock hawk watch is located in Washington Valley Park, on the First Watchung Ridge in Martinsville, New Jersey. The Somerset County Park Commission generously provides and maintains the platform and parking lot for the hawk watch…

Featherbed Lane Banding Station

Banding Station Website

Satellite View

This is the home page of the Featherbed Lane Banding Station, one of the longest-running privately-run bird banding research and training projects in North America…

Sandy Hook Bird Observatory

Webpage

Satellite View

The Sandy Hook Bird Observatory was established in 2001 by the New Jersey Audubon Society at Gateway National Recreation Area, Sandy Hook Unit in the Historic Fort Hancock District. The Observatory replaces the Owl Haven Nature Center in Tennent established in 1978…

Reserves

Lorrimer Sanctuary

Webpage

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790 Ewing Avenue, PO Box 125, Franklin Lakes, NJ 07417 (201) 891-2185

New Jersey Appalachian Trail Conservancy

Website

The Appalachian Trail along the Kittatinny Range in New Jersey is rugged and more remote than one might expect considering its proximity to large population centers, with abundant wildlife, including an active bear population…

Parvin State Park

Webpage

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The Birds of Parvin State Park - A website that details all the birds found at Parvin State Park, New Jersey. Also contains other information about the park, and has a blog detailing the latest sightings…

Plainsboro Preserve

Webpage

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Plainsboro Preserve, 80 Scotts Corner Road, Cranbury, NJ 08512, Phone: (609) 897-9400

Sherman-Hoffman Sanctuaries

Webpage

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Scherman-Hoffman Sanctuaries are New Jersey Audubon's twin sanctuaries in Bernardsville, Basking Ridge, and Harding Township, NJ. In 1965 Mr. and Mrs. Harry Scherman donated a 125 acre tract of land with an endowment to the New Jersey Audubon Society. Later, in 1973 and 1975, Mr. G. Frederick Hoffman donated parcels of land. The Hoffman house, barn and caretaker's house were added to the sanctuary in 1981 at the time of Mr. Hoffman's death. This completed what is now Scherman-Hoffman Sanctuaries, 260 acres of woodland, field, and floodplain habitat supporting over 200 species of wildlife over the course of a year.

Warren E Fox Nature Center

Information

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Atlantic County, New Jersey maintains a sprawling system of parks totalling thousands of acres of beautiful woodlands and wetlands throughout the county. Combined these areas offer a wide range of outdoor activities that everyone can enjoy.

Blogs

A Case of Birdigo

Blog

Sightings and musings of a teenager birder from New Jersey…

Behind the Bins

Blog

Just me behind the bins, out and about looking for birds…

Beth Graham

Blog

News, thoughts and adventures in birding…

Birds, Butterflies and Sunsets

Blog

…at Cape May Point…

Kevin Bolton - Jersey Digiscoping

Blog

New Jersey birding Photographer and Digiscoper…

New Jersey Outdoors

Blog

With a heavy focus on birding, this site wanders through the Garden State in search of fun outdoor activity, conservation groups, rare birds, and much much more!

Woodcreeper

Blog

A sort of birding BLOG with photos etc…

Other Links

Backyard Wild Birds

Website

We feature select quality products and complete solutions to backyard wild birding. Our 'Bird Feeding Kits' & systems can include bird feeders, bird feeder poles, and squirrel stopping baffle protectors. Invite wild birds to your backyard to provide an endless source of nature's beauty and enjoyment for all!

Barnegat Lighthouse

Website

A series of photographs of birds taken, presumably, from the lighthouse…

Birding in New Jersey

Website

New Jersey's Birds and our mission to see them all…

Cape May Birding and Birds

Website

A series of articles etc. from the Cape May Times…

Just Binoculars

Website

Binoculars, Spotting Scopes and Rangefinders from Name Brand Manufacturers at the Lowest Prices. We carry binoculars for hunting, boating, birding and traveling as well as binoculars for star gazing, equine sports, night vision and sporting events. Top Name Brands from Steiner, Zeiss, Nikon, Leupold, Bushnell and Tasco. From this New Jersey based company.

New Jersey Nature Notes

Website

A website dedicated to nature, science and the environment, centered but not limited to New Jersey, USA. The site is heavily oriented to birds and birding…

Pat & Clay Sutton

Website

Pat Sutton lives near Cape May, New Jersey, the world renowned migratory crossroads that is famous for its hawk, owl, songbird, shorebird, and Monarch butterfly migration. She has keenly studied the natural world for over 30 years.

Photographers & Artists

Photographer - Douglas Goodell

Gallery

Welcome! This is Douglas Goodell`s photo site featuring birds and related scenes. The images are presented in galleries, arranged mostly by species type. What`s New highlights new works before they are integrated into the galleries; a few favorites are shown separately. Note that space is limited, so not all images are shown here. If you are looking for something in particular that is not in the galleries, or have comments, please contact me.