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Dublin

Wader
Oystercatcher Haematopus ostralegus ©Geoff Hunt Website

Birding Dublin

Dublin is located on the east coast of Ireland in the province of Leinster. The area held county status until its dissolution as such in 1994. County Dublin, or more correctly today the Dublin Region, is the area that contains the city of Dublin, the capital and largest city of the state of Ireland as well as the largest city on the island of Ireland; and the modern counties of Dun Laoghaire-Rathdown, Fingal and South Dublin. The Dublin Regional Authority is the regional authority for the region. Dublin was one of the oldest of the Counties of Ireland to be formally structured.

Dublin is situated at the mouth of the River Liffey and encompasses a land area of approximately 115 square kilometres (44 sq mi) in east-central Ireland. It is bordered by a low mountain range to the south and surrounded by flat farmland to the north and west. The Liffey divides the city in two between the Northside and the Southside. Each of these is further divided by two lesser rivers – the River Tolka running southeast into Dublin Bay, and the River Dodder running northeast to the mouth of the Liffey. Two further water bodies – the Grand Canal on the southside and the Royal Canal on the northside – ring the inner city on their way from the west and the River Shannon. The River Liffey bends at Leixlip from a northeasterly route to a predominantly eastward direction, and this point also marks the transition to urban development from more agricultural land usage.

Similar to much of the rest of northwestern Europe, Dublin experiences a maritime climate with cool summers, mild winters, and a lack of temperature extremes.

There are many green-spaces around the city, and Dublin City Council manages over 1,500 hectares (3,700 acres) of parks. Public parks include the Phoenix Park, Herbert Park and St Stephen's Green. The Phoenix Park is about 3 km (2 miles) west of the city centre, north of the River Liffey. Its 16-kilometre (10 mi) perimeter wall encloses 707 hectares (1,750 acres), making it one of the largest walled city parks in Europe. It includes large areas of grassland and tree-lined avenues, and since the 17th century has been home to a herd of wild Fallow deer.

Top Sites

Birding Sites in the Dublin Area

Webpage

Over 250 species of bird have been recorded in Dublin and most of the birding sites are accessible by public transport!

North Bull Island

Webpage

Satellite View

Just outside of Dublin city, this habitat contains tidal mudflats, alder marsh and an extensive dune system. In winter and spring holds large numbers of wildfowl (including pale-bellied Brent Geese) and waders. In autumn, a good passage of Curlew Sandpipers and Little Stint are seen every year. Is also excellent for Nearctic waders with Killdeer, Buff-breasted, Pectoral and Semi-palmated Sandpipers recorded, as well as Wilson's Phalarope. Easily reached by public transport from Dublin city.

Contributor

Wikipedia

County Recorder

Useful Reading

Fieldguides & Other Birding Books
For a full list of fieldguides and other books see the Republic of Ireland page

Organisations

Birdwatch Ireland - Fingal Branch

Website

Welcome to the Fingal branch of Birdwatch Ireland. Fingal is situated in North Co. Dublin and can boast of great birding spots for the beginner and experienced birder alike. Fingal extends from the outer limits of Dublin city to Meath in the North and to the West…

BirdWatch Ireland - South Dublin Branch

Website

The South Dublin Branch of BirdWatch Ireland, the national NGO bird conservation group, has over 1000 members in the south city catchment. The branch organises frequent meetings, slide shows, local and coach field trips and its members are active in many local and national conservation projects.Non-members are more than welcome to all events.

BirdWatch Ireland - Tolka [North Dublin] Branch

Website

BirdWatch Ireland is the Irish partner of BirdLife International, a global partnership of conservation organisations working to protect the world`s birds and their habitats. It has a number of nature reserves throughout the Republic of Ireland, and undertakes surveys and research to increase the knowledge of Irish birds and to establish a sound basis for conservation. The organisation has a regional branch network which provides a range of educational, recreational and conservation activity programmes. Tolka Branch We are on the north side of Dublin City, covering the postal districts through which the River Tolka flows.

Reserves

Abbreviations Key

NR Rogerstown

Webpage

Satellite View

The Rogerstown Nature Reserve is set within the inner Rogerstown estuary - a relatively small, narrow and extremely shallow estuary with extensive mudflats at low tide. The reserve was an area of reclaimed land used as grazing pasture, but is now being restored back to saltmarsh. The saltmarsh is inundated with sea water to varying degrees on a daily basis. It is during these times that the brackish grasslands and inter-tidal creeks are extremely important for birds, providing safe roosting sites for thousands of wintering wildfowl and waders. The soft mud flats, exposed during low tides, are their feeding areas. The winter time is when Golden Plover, Lapwing, Curlew, Black-tailed Godwits, Dunlin, Redshank, Light-bellied Brent Geese, Shelduck, Wigeon and Teal are numerous. During the summer Lapwings breed and the surrounding trees are home to a variety of summer visitors, such as Willow Warblers, Chiffchaffs and Blackcaps, especially within the Turvey Parklands, managed by Fingal County Council.

NR Shenick Island

Webpage

Satellite View

The Shenick Island Reserve is one of a group of three islands situated just offshore from the town of Skerries. The reserve is connected to the mainland by sandflats exposed at low tide. During the summer months, a small population of Fulmars breed on the low lying cliffs, as do Herring and Great Black-backed Gulls. In winter the islands are frequented by Light-bellied Brent Geese and waders such as Oystercatchers feeding around the shore. Short-eared Owls may be seen hunting over the middle of the island.

Trip Reports

CloudBirders

Trip Report Repository

CloudBirders was created by a group of Belgian world birding enthusiasts and went live on 21st of March 2013. They provide a large and growing database of birding trip reports, complemented with extensive search, voting and statistical features.