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British Birds interactive

…an entire bookcase on a single DVD-ROM

Turnstones will eat anything from soap bars to human corpses. Great Tits first learned to break into milk bottles in 1929. Coots are fond of goose droppings as a light snack. And exactly why are Capercaillie cocks so big?

In depth information on these and thousands more fascinating ornithological topics is now instantly to hand in British Birds interactive. To celebrate its first 100 years, the entire contents of the journal British Birds has been digitised and made searchable from 1907 to the present day. That's literally an entire bookcase on a single DVD-ROM. Using BirdGuides' powerful software you can browse tens of thousands of articles, photographs and outstanding species accounts covering bird behaviour, conservation, distribution, identification, status and taxonomy: an incredible resource for anyone interested in British ornithology.This invaluable birding tool will be launched at the British Birdwatching Fair on Friday 17th August 2007.

What's special about British Birds?

For 100 years the journal British Birds has been at the forefront of British birdwatching. It is THE place to report significant ornithological sightings and events, to publish ground-breaking articles on identification, to showcase the talents of top bird photographers and artists. Birdwatchers have used British Birds (or BB as it is widely known) as their key work of reference as it offers many significant features:This invaluable birding tool will be launched at the British Birdwatching Fair on Friday 17th August 2007.

What's special about British Birds?

For 100 years the journal British Birds has been at the forefront of British birdwatching. It is THE place to report significant ornithological sightings and events, to publish ground-breaking articles on identification, to showcase the talents of top bird photographers and artists. Birdwatchers have used British Birds (or BB as it is widely known) as their key work of reference as it offers many significant features: * The annual rarities report - listing all the accepted sightings of every rare bird in Britain
* The annual rare breeding birds report - documenting the numbers of pairs of rare breeding birds known each year
* Definitive identification reviews and studies including less-familiar birds - describing what was known about particular species found in limited parts of Europe, often including the first published photos
* Recent reports - summaries of the movements, influxes and sightings during the previous month
* Notes - often remarkable reports of birds doing things not previously described.
* News and Comment - a record of all that was happening at that time in the world of birdwatching
* Firsts for Britain - detailing the circumstances of the finding of birds never before seen in this country.
* Mystery photographs - identification puzzles with the answers provided the following monthIt is in BB that many of the best bird photographers and artists have showcased their work. The journal's pages have been graced by classic photos by the likes of Eric Hosking, JB & S Bottomley, RJ Chandler, Jens and Hanne Eriksen and superb illustrations by artists such as Richard Richardson, Lars Jonsson, Robert Gillmor and Alan Harris.

The main papers have included a fascinating range of topics including summaries of the latest knowledge by top scientists such as Nick Davies on the remarkable sex life of Dunnocks and Peter Berthold on theories of bird navigation. Well-covered topics include taxonomy, bird distributions, population changes, migration, habitat changes, conservation issues. Here's a chance to see how our understanding has developed over 100 years and to look back at how events such as the spread of the Collared Dove and the pesticide poisoning of Peregrines were documented at the time. Many birdwatchers constantly reach for their shelves bulging with past volumes of British Birds as an endless source of reference and pleasure. But there are very few, if any, complete collections going back all the way to the first edition in 1907. Now everyone can own every issue from every volume immediately accessible on their computer.

What's special about having all this content on DVD-ROM?

The content of 100 years of British Birds is so fascinating, so significant and so informative that it would be amazing just to have it all in one place - not just a whole book, or even a whole shelf-full but a whole bookcase of material all on one disk. But this DVD-ROM has been designed to provide much more than just a copy of all that content. It also allows you to search, filter and display the articles, photos and illustrations in ways that could never be possible in print form. Here are just some of the possibilities:View all the photos of any species - these can be displayed as thumbnails or at any size up to full screen giving an overview of the photos available.

Compare any photos side-by-side.

the papers on any topic - identification or taxonomy or populations or behaviour can all be presented separately.

the papers, notes or letters about any species - including correspondence

illustrations by any artist

the letters or notes by any author - there's hours of fun to be had just looking through the contributions of controversial characters such as WRP Bourne!Search all the text for every mention of any word. You may have a specific research topic e.g. kleptoparasitism or you may want to look up what has been written about your local patch or you might just want to see every mention of your own name!

British Birds interactive is published by BirdGuides in association with British Birds. The price is £99 (plus £1.99 P&P) and it can be ordered online from http://www.birdguides.com or by telephone 0800 919391.

For further information, to requst product photographs or a review copy please see http://www.birdguides.com/bbi or contact:

Dr Fiona Barclay
BirdGuides Ltd
fiona@birdguides.com
020 8749 3354
07818 424487

Adrian Pitches
British Birds
07711 056971

4th July 2014