Fatbirder - linking birders worldwide... Wildlife Travellers see our sister site: WAND

Index

Britain`s Birds Respond to Climate Change

Britain`s Birds are already responding to climate change. Three examples of results from research by British Trust for Ornithology (BTO) volunteers areā€¦

Britain`s Birds Respond to Climate Change
Britain`s Birds are already responding to climate change. Three examples of results from research by British Trust for Ornithology (BTO) volunteers are given below:Earlier Nesting

One of the most striking patterns to come out of the BTO`s annual nest monitoring programme is that more than a third of the species are showing strong trends towards earlier laying. Some species are laying up to three weeks earlier, on average, than they were thirty years ago. Long-tailed Tit, for instance, is already nesting 8 days earlier and Dr Humphrey Crick of BTO is predicting that, by 2080, the species will be nesting a further 14 days earlier. Picture available from images@bto.org. These unexpected findings shows the importance of the Nest Record Scheme as a long-term monitoring project and immediately suggests links to global climate change. These results have been followed up with more detailed analyses to show that the trends are closely related to trends in spring weather, confirming that our birds are sensitive indicators of climate change. The BTO`s Nest Record Scheme is funded in partnership with JNCC. See: www.bto.org/survey/nrs.htm BTO contact - Humphrey Crick - 01842 750050 - humphrey.crick@bto.org More Birds Over-wintering

With milder winters, it is not surprising that more birds which were once considered summer migrants are taking the lazy option and staying in this country. Chiffchaff is the classic example. See: www.bto.org/migwatch/text/species/chiff.htm BTO contact - Graham Appleton or Greg Conway - 01842 750050 - graham.appleton@bto.org or greg.conway@bto.org Migration Patterns

One of the predictions of climate researchers is that weather patterns will become less stable. The increased variability makes life harder for migrant birds, planning their travels to and from Africa. This year`s bad weather in southern Europe and North Africa has blocked much of this spring`s migration. Millions of birds of species such as Swallow, Willow Warbler and Sand Martin seem to have been delayed by dust storms and heavy rain - it could be that many are dead. BTO volunteers all over the country are monitoring spring migration. For more information on Migration Watch and up-to-date maps see: www.bto.org/migwatch BTO contact - Graham Appleton or Dawn Balmer - 01842 750050 graham.appleton@bto.org or dawn.balmer@bto.org (not today, Friday, for Dawn)

4th July 2014