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Eritrea

Blue-breasted Bee-eater Merops variegates © Jason Anderson ibis.atwebpages.com/birdwatching_in_eritrea/

Birding in Eritrea

Eritrea is a wonderful birdwatching destination. Despite its small size and the relative scarcity of visiting birders, nearly 580 species have been recorded here. It shares nearly 20 of the prized Abyssinian endemics with Ethiopia, including Wattled Ibis, Rouget's Rail, Ruppell's (Black) Chat, Ethiopian Oriole, Black-winged Lovebird, Abyssinian Woodpecker, Banded Barbet, Abyssinian Slaty Flycatcher, White-backed Black Tit and White-billed Starling.

The country can be split into three basic ecoregions. To the east of the highlands are the hot, arid coastal plains stretching down to Djibouti in the south. The cooler, more fertile highlands split the country in two, reaching up to 3000m. Habitats here vary from the sub-tropical rainforest at Filfil Solomuna to the precipitous cliffs and gorges of the southern highlands. To the west of the highlands, the gently sloping plains of Gash Bark fall into the Sudan-Guinea biome, home to many species typical of Sahel savannah.

Eritrea also happens to lie on one of the major migration routes into Africa, guaranteeing excellent birdwatching in both spring and autumn, concentrated along the coastal plain, and the eastern escarpment edge of the highlands. Large numbers of raptors pass through Eritrea on their way to their wintering grounds in central and southern Africa.

The country is poor, and bureaucracy is strict, but the people are kind and very friendly, and travelling within the permitted areas it is safe. Crime is very low by African standards, as is street hassle. A good guide is necessary to get you to all the best locations and to help with the bureaucracy but in a week it is easily possible to visit the hotspots, see most of the endemics and take home about 200 species.

Key Species

Many Abyssinian endemcis can be found here. In the right habitat, Ruppell's (Black) Chat, Wattled Ibis, White-cheeked Turaco, Black-winged Lovebird, White-billed Starling, White-collared Pigeon, White-throated Seed-eater, Abyssinian Slaty Flycatcher, Banded Barbet, Ethiopian Oriole and Ethiopian Cisticola (C. Lugubris) are all common breeding species. Rarer, but still regularly recorded are White-winged Cliff Chat (Mocking Cliff Chat is common throughout the highlands), White-backed Black Tit, Abyssinian Woodpecker, Thick-billed Raven and Blue Saw-wing (Psalidoprocne pristoptera).

There are also a large number of near-endemics (birds which are native to the Horn of Africa): Erckel's Francolin, Blanford's Lark, White-headed (Cretschmar's) Babbler, White-rumped Babbler, Abyssinian Black Wheatear, Somali Starling, Swainson's Sparrow, Ruppell's Weaver, African Citril and Brown-rumped Seed-eater.

Eritrea’s extensive coastal mangrove forests are the only place in Africa where White-collared Kingfisher breeds, and a recent study* found that the Eritrean Red Sea islands are of international importance as breeding sites for a number of sea and shorebirds, including White-eyed Gull (33% of the world population), Crab Plover (20% of world population), Lesser Crested Tern, Brown Noddy, Eurasian Spoonbill, Brown Booby, Greater Crested Tern, White-cheeked Tern and Bridled Tern. The threatened Socotra Cormorant is also suspected to breed on the southern islands.

*Dawit Semere et al. The Status of Breeding Seabirds and Waterbirds on the Eritrean Red Sea Islands; ABC Bulletin Vol. 15 No. 2, September 2008

Eritrea has plentiful raptor species (59 recorded). Lammergeier are still fairly frequent in the southern highlands, along with Ruppell’s Vulture and Griffon Vulture (winter). Verreaux’s Eagle, Tawny Eagle and Long-crested Eagle are resident, and large numbers of esp. Aquila eagle species can be found either on passage or throughout the winter, including Steppe Eagle, Lesser and Greater Spotted Eagle, Eastern Imperial Eagle and Wahlberg’s Eagle. Significant numbers of these migrating species can be counted along the eastern escarpment of the Abyssinian highlands near Asmara, especially at the Asmara rubbish dump in February/March.

The rocky uplands in Adi Keih and Senafe Sub Zobas are particularly good for Wheatears (11 species in Eritrea), Chats (10 species in Eritrea) and Rock Thrushes.

Travel permits for all the locations listed below can be obtained from the tourist office in Asmara. Remember that the Eritreans are not used to people birdwatching in their country, and there is a large military presence in some areas. Always ask before getting out your binoculars if in doubt! However, if you explain to most people what you are doing they are nearly always amenable and interested. In two years living in the country, I had very few problems and converted several Eritreans to the hobby!

More on these sites and other locations can be found on the website Birdwatching in Eritrea: ibis.atwebpages.com/birdwatching_in_eritrea/

Top Sites

Adi Keih Sub Zoba:

Website

Adi Keih Sub Zoba is excellent for Abyssinian endemics and highland specialities: Several sites near Adi Keih provide good birdwatching, especially for the Abyssinian endemics: Hawatsu: is on the road between Segeneiti and Adi Keih, 41km after Segeneiti, 9km before Adi Keih. There is a dam here which is productive for waders and other waterbirds for most of the year. Just upstream of the dam is a grassy pasture where Wattled Ibis often feed in the thickest grass. Also, near here on the other side of the road is a small valley (near the Eucalyptus copse, behind the few houses. Walk up this valley to find several of the Abyssinian endemic species in the copse of native trees that still survive in a small gorge here. Highlight species include: Wattled Ibis, White-billed Starling, Abyssinian Slaty Flycatcher, Banded Barbet, White-cheeked Turaco, Erckel's Francolin, Northern Paradise Flycatcher, Klaas's Cuckoo, Brown Woodland Warbler, Tacazze Sunbird, Ruppell's Robin Chat, Long-legged Buzzard (winter), Maccoa Duck, Verreaux’s Eagle and Temminck’s Courser on the plateau above the copse.

Safira/Qohaito & Karibossa: Qohaito is famous for its Auxmite archaeological remains, but birdwatching is particularly good here too. There are some steep cliffs to the east where Ruppell’s and Egyptian Vulture nest, and White-collared Pigeon roost, while Alpine and Mottled Swift hurtle past. Near the so-called ‘Egyptian Tomb’ is a steep valley where several other endemics can be found, including Ruppell’s Black Chat, Black-winged Lovebird, Banded Barbet and the rare White-backed Black Tit. If you have time to drive further along the road to Karibossa, this village has quite a few native trees and is very good for the Abyssinian endemics, including Abyssinian Slaty Flycatcher, Black-winged Lovebird, White-billed Starling, White-cheeked Turaco, Banded Barbet, White-collared Pigeon, Ruppell's Black Chat and White-throated Seed-eater. Other local delicacies include: Verreaux's Eagle Owl, Little Rock Thrush, African Olive Pigeon (newly discovered here), Red-fronted Tinkerbird, Brown-rumped Seed-eater, Slender-billed Starling, Erckel's Francolin, Lanner Falcon, Tawny Eagle, Ruppell's Vulture and Egyptian Vulture.

Asmara for the eastern escarpment and waterbirds at surrounding reservoirs:

Website

The escarpment edge is often productive for migrating species, especially raptors. The best places to see them are easily accessed along the Massawa road. The Asmara rubbish dump can be smelt to the left side of the road as soon as you start descending from Asmara, just past the customs checkpoint. From October to December, and especially from February to March large numbers of Aquila eagles congregate here along with other raptors and lots of Hamadryas Baboons (seen best early morning). A little further along the road is Bar Durfo, less smelly but often with good views of raptors cruising on the thermals nearby. To find other migrant species, park on the Asmara side of the checkpoint, and explore the bushes along the escarpment edge just below the orthodox church nearby. Species here could include: Steppe Eagle, Tawny Eagle, Eastern Imperial Eagle, Booted Eagle, Lesser Spotted Eagle, Wahlberg's Eagle, Verreaux's Eagle, African Hawk Eagle, Black Kite, Common Buzzard, Augur Buzzard, Lanner Falcon, Peregrine Falcon, Common Kestrel, Abdim's Stork, Nyanza Swift, White-rumped Swift, Alpine Swift, Mottled Swift, White-rumped Babbler, Banded Barbet. Smaller migrants that are seen in spring and autumn include Common Cuckoo, Ortolan Bunting, Wryneck, Golden Oriole, Eurasian Hoopoe, Eurasian Bee-eater, Red-backed Shrike, Woodchat Shrike, Isabelline Shrike, Whitethroat and several swallow species, including Red-rumped Swallow and House Martin.

Several reservoirs (‘deega’ in Tigrinya) near Asmara are productive for migrating waders, wildfowl and other waterbirds. Mai Nefe (20km from Asmara towards Mendefera) has the largest dam. Smaller but often productive are Acria and Adi Nfas (accessed via an unsurfaced road that heads north east out of Asmara), Mai Sarwa (just west of the main road to Keren – turn off at Adi Ebeito) and Radar (due west of Asmara, near the large antenna that can be seen from the city). Species at these dams could include: Little Grebe, Great-crested Grebe, Long-tailed Cormorant, Great Cormorant, Pink-backed Pelican, Black-headed Heron, Squacco Heron, Little Egret, Cattle Egret, Hammerkop, Yellow-billed Stork, White Stork, Black Stork, Abdim's Stork, Greater Flamingo, Sacred Ibis, Glossy Ibis, Garganey, Eurasian Wigeon, Common Teal, Northern Pintail, Northern Shoveler, Common Pochard, Ferruginous Duck, Tufted Duck, Maccoa Duck, Black Kite, Black-shouldered Kite, African Fish Eagle, Augur Buzzard, Tawny Eagle, African Hawk Eagle, African Harrier Hawk, Lesser Kestrel, Lanner Falcon, Collared Pratincole, Spur-winged Lapwing, Black-winged Stilt, Three-banded Plover, Ruff, Marsh Sandpiper, Wood Sandpiper, Green Sandpiper, Common Sandpiper, Redshank, White-winged Tern, Blue-breasted Bee-eater, European Bee-eater, Yellow-breasted Barbet, Eurasian Hoopoe, Thelka Lark, Yellow Wagtail, White-throated Robin (Irania), Isabelline Wheatear, Mocking Cliff-chat, Whitethroat, Spotted Flycatcher, Fiscal Shrike, Tacazze Sunbird, Pale Rock Finch, Yellow-bellied Waxbill, African Quailfinch, African Citril and Streaky Seed-eater. There is also some irrigated agricultural land just downstream of Radar Dam where there is a small resident population of Wattled Ibis. Acria is particularly worth a visit in February or March. There are lots of animal remains by the glue/soap processing factories here and large numbers of raptors congregate; I have counted roosts of up to 20 eagles in one tree!

Elabered for diversity and Hagaz for sub-Saharan savannah species:

Website

Hagaz is the easiest town to get to in the western lowlands, and therefore is good for species associated with the Sudan-Guinea biome. Along the way, it is recommended that you stop off at the Elabered Agricultural Estate (between Asmara and Keren – separate permit needed, ask at the tourist office) where there are several dams, plenty of forest, and over 100 species can be seen in a day.

Species that can be seen in Elabered include: Little Grebe, Reed Cormorant, Cattle Egret, Grey Heron, Black-headed Heron, Squacco Heron, Black-crowned Night Heron, Little Bittern, Purple Heron, Hammerkop, African Sacred Ibis, Pink-backed Pelican, Abdim's Stork, Black-shouldered Kite, African Harrier Hawk, Dark Chanting Goshawk, Gabar Goshawk, Helmeted Guineafowl, Clapperton's Francolin, Common Moorhen, Senegal Thick-knee, Spur-winged Plover, Three-banded Plover, Common Sandpiper, Green Sandpiper, White-winged Tern, Speckled Pigeon, Dusky Turtle Dove, Red-eyed Dove, Laughing Dove, Blue-spotted Wood Dove, Bruce's Green Pigeon, Namaqua Dove, Meyer's Parrot, Eastern Grey Plantain Eater, Klaas's Cuckoo, Barn Owl, Pearl-spotted Owlet, Little Swift, White-rumped Swift, Nyanza Swift, Speckled Mousebird, Blue-naped Mousebird, Black-billed Wood Hoopoe, Malachite Kingfisher, Grey-headed Kingfisher, Broad-billed Roller, Abyssinian Roller, Little Bee-eater, Blue-breasted Bee-eater, Northern Red-billed Hornbill, African Grey Hornbill, Hemprich's Hornbill, Yellow-breasted Barbet, Black-billed Barbet, Red-fronted Tinkerbird, Nubian Woodpecker, Sand Martin, Red-rumped Swallow, Lesser Striped Swallow, Ethiopian Swallow, Fork-tailed Drongo, Eurasian Golden Oriole, Common Bulbul, African Thrush, Mocking Cliff-chat, Tawny-flanked Prinia, Green-backed Eremomela, Grey-backed Camaroptera, Northern Crombec, African Paradise Flycatcher, Black-crowned Tchagra, Tropical Boubou, Red-winged Starling, Violet-backed Starling, Greater Blue-eared Starling, Variable Sunbird, Shining Sunbird, Beautiful Sunbird, Marico Sunbird, Abyssinian White-eye, House Sparrow, Swainson's Sparrow, Bush Petronia, Speckle-fronted Weaver, Ruppell's Weaver, Baglafecht Weaver, Little Weaver, Chestnut-crowned Sparrow Weaver, Northern Red Bishop, Red-billed Quelea, Red-billed Firefinch, African Firefinch, African Silverbill, Red-cheeked Cordon Bleu, Crimson-rumped Waxbill, Pin-tailed Whydah, White-rumped Seed- eater and Cinnamon-breasted Bunting.

Keren has a few good birdwatching sites, for example the Shrine of Mariam Da’erit. Hagaz is generally more productive, especially along the dry river beds of the two rivers that converge here, at the agricultural college and on the farmland west of Hagaz. Species that can be found here include African Sacred Ibis, Abdim's Stork, Black-shouldered Kite, Yellow-billed Kite, Dark Chanting Goshawk, Lanner Falcon, Helmeted Guineafowl, Black-headed Lapwing, Speckled Pigeon, African Mourning Dove, African Collared Dove, Laughing Dove, Blue-spotted Wood Dove, Namaqua Dove, Ring-necked Parakeet, White-browed Coucal, African Palm Swift, Little Swift, Nyanza Swift, Blue-naped Mousebird, Speckled Mousebird, Grey-headed Kingfisher, Abyssinian Roller, White-throated Bee-eater, Little Green Bee-eater, Yellow-breasted Barbet, Common Bulbul, Crested Lark, Chestnut-backed Sparrow Lark, Black-crowned Sparrow Lark, Ethiopian Swallow, Black Scrub Robin, Rufous-tailed Scrub Robin, Olivaceous Warbler, Cricket Warbler, Red-fronted Warbler, Yellow-bellied Eremomela, Northern Crombec, Greater Blue-eared Starling, Yellow-billed Oxpecker, Beautiful Sunbird, Nile Valley Sunbird, Shining Sunbird, House Sparrow, Northern Grey-headed Sparrow, Sudan Golden Sparrow, Bush Petronia, Cut-throat Finch, Speckle-fronted Weaver, Ruppell's Weaver, Little Weaver, Red-billed Quelea, Northern Red Bishop, Red-billed Firefinch, Red-cheeked Cordonbleu, Village Indigobird, Pin-tailed Whydah, White-rumped Seedeater, Golden-breasted Bunting

Filfil for rainforest species and Abyssinian endemics:

Website

Filfil is an amazing enigma in an otherwise fairly dry and sometimes barren country. There is extensive cloud rainforest here that benefits from the wet seasons of both the highlands and the lowlands, and attracts a lot of tropical forest species as well as several of the Abyssinian endemics higher up. It is sometimes called ‘Semenawi Bahri’. It is accessed via a surfaced road that leaves the Asmara-Keren road at Serajeka and winds down the escarpment edge to meet the Asmara Massawa road at Nefasit. The two best places to stop are the recreation centres at Sabur (1300m) and Medhanit (1000m). The scarce Abyssinian Woodpecker breeds at Sabur, and several other endemics can be found including White-cheeked Turaco, Banded Barbet, Black-winged Lovebird and Ethiopian Cisticola. Other species include: Lesser Kestrel, African Citril, Chiff Chaff, Grasshopper Warbler, Lesser Honeyguide, White Wagtail, Tawny-flanked Prinia, Long-legged Buzzard, Fan-tailed Raven, Tropical Boubou, Augur Buzzard, Variable Sunbird, Common Bulbul, Yellow-bellied Waxbill, Streaky Seed-eater, Erckel's Spurfowl, African Citril, Brown-rumped Seed-eater, Red-eyed Dove, Baglefecht Weaver, Little Rock Thrush, Song Thrush, Mountain Thrush, Black-headed Batis, Grey-backed Camaroptera, Northern Puffback, White-rumped Babbler, (suspected Black-winged Lovebird, but not seen), Speckled Mousebird, Black-crowned Tchagra, Nubian Woodpecker, Banded Barbet and African Paradise Flycatcher.

Medhanit has the largest trees and small amounts of primary growth woodland in the valley nearby. This is the best spot in Eritrea for Abyssinian Oriole and Narina Trogon. Walk along the road both uphill and downhill of the restaurant and hotel to see the birds. A good place for White-throated Seed-eater (Serinus xanthopygius), one of the Abyssinian endemics is about two or three kilometres down the road from the hotel, where the forest opens up a little. Adventurous birders can try following the tracks created by the numerous Greater Kudu, Warthog and Bushbuck down into the valley. Other species here include Hammerkop, Common Kestrel, Lesser Kestrel, African Goshawk, Shikra, Steppe Eagle, Augur Buzzard, African Hawk Eagle, Erckel’s Francolin, Speckled Pigeon, African Olive Pigeon, Red-eyed Dove, Dusky Turtle Dove, African Collared Dove, Bruce's Green Pigeon, Blue-spotted Wood-Dove, Namaqua Dove, White-cheeked Turaco, Eastern Grey Plantain Eater, Plain Nightjar, Little Swift, Speckled Mousebird, Narina Trogon, Purple Roller, European Bee-eater, Blue-breasted Bee-eater, Hemprich's Hornbill, Northern Red-billed Hornbill, African Grey Hornbill, Black-billed Barbet, Banded Barbet, Nubian Woodpecker, Barn Swallow, House Martin, African White Wagtail, Grey Wagtail, White-rumped Babbler, Common Bulbul, Song Thrush, Mountain Thrush, Ruppell's Robin Chat, Little Rock Thrush, Fork-tailed Drongo, Golden Oriole, Ethiopian Oriole, Fan-tailed Raven, Marsh Warbler, Willow Warbler, Brown Woodland Warbler, Blackcap, Whitethroat, Grey-backed Camaroptera, African Paradise Flycatcher, Black-headed Batis, Red-tailed Shrike, Northern Puffback, Tropical Boubou, Black-crowned Tchagra, White Helmet Shrike, Red-winged Starling, Greater Blue Eared Starling, Red-billed Oxpecker, Variable Sunbird, Abyssinian/Montane White-eye, Grey-headed Sparrow, Baglafecht Weaver, Red-cheeked Cordon Bleu, Yellow-bellied (Swee) Waxbill, Streaky Seed-eater, , Brown-rumped Seed-eater and Ortolan Bunting.

Filfil Solomuna a little further down the valley can also be productive, although be sure to ask permission from the soldiers in the nearby camp before using binoculars or camara here and stick to the road.

Massawa and the Dahlak Islands for seabirds, shorebirds and coastal migrants:

Website

Satellite View

The coastal town of Massawa is an incredible place to visit, for its history and architecture as much as for the birds. The best birdwatching sites are near the town, and include the small flats by the causeway to the mainland (at low tide), the beach at Gurgussum (10km north of Massawa), the shallow lagoons 4km north of Gurgussum and the mangrove forest on Green Island (boats can be hired from the Diving Centre or Mike’s Boats in Massawa). South of Massawa towards Foro there is more extensive mangrove forest, where the rare White-collared Kingfisher breeds, although birdwatching is not permitted around the Hirgigo power station. Exploring the Dahlaks takes longer, although boats can easily be chartered through travel agents in Asmara (Explore is one) or through the Dive Centre or Mike’s Boats in Massawa itself. 2 days are needed to visit the most interesting islands, and as well as the birds, there are plentiful dolphin species, dugong, leatherback turtle, whale shark and manta ray. Snorkelling and diving are both excellent here. Recommended islands include Dissei, Dahlak Kebir, Dahret and Dur ghella.

Species at Gurgussum and the lagoons nearby include: Brown Booby, Pink-backed Pelican, Great White Pelican, Greater Flamingo, Lesser Flamingo, Green-backed Heron, Western Reef Heron, Grey Heron, Goliath Heron, Abdim's Stork, Sacred Ibis, Eurasian Spoonbill, African Spoonbill, Shoveler, Tufted Duck, Pintail, Teal, Osprey, Common Kestrel, Crab Plover, Black-winged Stilt, Avocet, Eurasian Oystercatcher, Ringed Plover, Three-banded Plover, Kentish Plover, Mongolian Plover, Greater Sand Plover, Grey Plover, Sanderling, Curlew Sandpiper, Dunlin, Bar-tailed Godwit, Black-tailed Godwit, Whimbrel, Curlew, Common Redshank, Wood Sandpiper, Marsh Sandpiper, Terek Sandpiper, Common Sandpiper, Ruddy Turnstone, Sooty Gull, White-eyed Gull, Common Black-headed Gull, Slender-billed Gull, Lesser Black-backed Gull, Heuglin's Gull, Caspian Gull, Gull-billed Tern, Caspian Tern, Greater Crested Tern, Lesser Crested Tern, Sandwich Tern, Common Tern, White-cheeked Tern, Saunders's Tern, African Palm Swift, Crested Lark, Black-crowned Sparrow Lark, Black Wheatear, Graceful Prinia, Yellow Wagtail, White Wagtail, Isabelline Wheatear, House Crow and Village Weaver.

Green Island species include occasional White-collared Kingfisher, Osprey, Yellow-billed Kite, Lesser Black-backed Gull, Sooty Gull, Sacred Ibis (breeding), Brown Booby, Lesser Crested Tern, Greater Sand Plover, Pink-backed Pelican (breeding), House Crow, Kentish Plover, Curlew, Grey Plover, Crab Plover, Eurasian Spoonbill (breeding), Striated Heron, Purple Heron, Redshank, Ruddy Turnstone, Greater Flamingo, Western Reef Heron, Little Stint, Terek Sandpiper, Whimbrel, Gull-billed Tern, Slender-billed Gull, Greater Crested Tern, Greenshank, Common Sandpiper, Heuglin's Gull, Caspian Tern, Dunlin, Eurasian Reed Warbler, Senegal Thick-knee, Saunder's Tern and Graceful Prinia,

Species in the Dahlak Islands include Brown Booby, Pink-backed Pelican, Green-backed Heron, Western Reef Heron, Great White Egret, Greater Flamingo, Abdim’s Stork, Osprey, Black Kite, Egyptian Vulture, Hooded Vulture, Sooty Falcon, Arabian Bustard, Crab Plover, Bar-tailed Godwit, Whimbrel, Eurasian Curlew, Common Redshank, Common Sandpiper, Sanderling, Little Stint, Lesser Black-backed Gull, Sooty Gull, White-eyed Gull, Slender-billed Gull, Lesser-crested Tern, Caspian Tern, Common Tern, Sandwich Tern, Chestnut-bellied Sandgrouse, Blue-spotted Wood Dove, Speckled Pigeon, African Collared Dove, Black-crowned Sparrow Lark, Somali Crow, Pied Crow, Blackstart, Common Fiscal and Southern Grey Shrike.

Contributor

Number of Species

Number of bird species: 577

Endemics

(But 14 birds are shared ONLY with Ethiopia)

Checklist

Checklist

WebBirder Checklist

Fatbirder's very own checklists are now available through WebBirder

Useful Reading

A Checklist of the Birds of Ethiopia

EK Urban and LH Brown 143 pages, maps, illus. Ethiopian Wildlife and Natural History Society

ISBN: 35908

Buy this book from NHBS.com

Birds of Ethiopia & Eritrea

by John Ash & John Atkins - A&C Black 2009 Hardback 463p

ISBN: 9781408109793

Buy this book from NHBS.com

Birds of the Horn of Africa

by Nigel Redman, Terry Stevenson & John Fanshawe - A&C Black 2009 - Paperback 496p

ISBN: 9781408157350

Buy this book from NHBS.com

Organisations

African Bird Club

Website

Eritrea has a bird list of over 500 species but there has been little ornithological activity for some thirty or forty years. Sadly, long running disputes with Ethiopia and political instability have impacted habitat and species adversely as well as limiting opportunities for visiting birders. With little tourist infrastructure, Eritrea is likely to appeal to the more adventurous or pioneering birder. This small country can however be a rewarding destination for birders who in just a few days could see a substantial number of species, including many near endemics and regional endemics as well as countless passage migrants.

Trip Reports

CloudBirders

Trip Report Repository

CloudBirders was created by a group of Belgian world birding enthusiasts and went live on 21st of March 2013. They provide a large and growing database of birding trip reports, complemented with extensive search, voting and statistical features.

1998 [March] Mike Rogerson

Report

covers a 4 week period in Abyssinia - 3 weeks in Ethiopia, 1 week in Eritrea and 24 hours in Djibouti…

2005 [January] - Morten Brendstrup-Hansen

Report

Pdf

Guides & Tour Operators

Birding Pal

Information

Local birders willing to show visiting birders around their area…

Places to Stay

Hotels in Asmera

Accommodation

The many hotels, restaurants and pensions in Asmara cater to every price range and level of comfort…

Other Links

Birds in Tigray

Website

Ethiopia is rich in birds. Of ca. 1850 species found in Africa, a little less than 850 are recorded from Ethiopia, together with Eritrea. Although Tigray only covers 1/15 of the area of these two countries approximately 500 bird species can be seen here! It is not a coincidence that Tigray is rich in birds. The variety in habitats over a vast altitude range is large. Though there are birds that can be found almost everywhere, many bird species are adapted to live in different environments with their own specific geographical features and subsequently specific flora and fauna.

Birdwatching in Eritrea

Website

Eritrea is not well known as a birdwatching destination. But it should be. Despite being one of the most 'underbirded' countries in Africa, it has an impressive checklist of over 560 species, which is increasing rapidly. Ethiopia is famous as one of the best birding destinations in the world. Most highly prized are its Abyssinian 'endemics', many of which are in fact shared with Eritrea, as the Abyssinian Highlands are split between the two countries…

Eritrea Species Checklist

Checklist

his comprehensive checklist includes all the species reliably recorded in Eritrea. We have kept it as close as possible to the sequence used in the field guide that visiting birders are most likely to use: Redman, Stevenson and Fanshawe: Birds of the Horn of Africa (Christopher Helm, 2009), following the order and taxonomy given in the checklist at the back of the book….

Eritrean Fauna

Website

Eritrea's range of habitats is surprisingly diverse, and its birdlife is correspondingly rich. A total of 537 species of birds have been recorded, including the rare blue saw-wing…

Seawater Farms Eritrea

Website

Seawater Farms Eritrea is unlike any farm ever built. Webegan its construction by cutting a huge channel from the Red Sea. This salt water river, wide enough for small boats, runs onto the land where it provides water to the land-based brick and concrete circles in which we raise our shrimp. It also fills the three salt lakes that hold the bulk of our fish and nurtures the thousands of mangroves that will shade its shores, irrigates our field crops, and finally drains into a seawater gardenparks that is also accessible to boating. This seawater gardenparks, forested by several varieties of mangroves, will shelter innumerable species of flora and fauna; herons, flamingos, and other shorebirds, marine animals of many kinds - and will provide controlled grazing for domestic animals like goats and camels.